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Clinton terminates aid to Honduras

After Secretary of State Hillary Clinton met with Honduras’ ousted President Manuel Zelaya today, the State Department announced that Clinton has decided to terminate U.S. assistance to Honduras. Clinton had previously suspended U.S. assistance to the Central American state in the wake of the June 28 coup. Negotiations led by Costan Rican President Oscar Arias ...

After Secretary of State Hillary Clinton met with Honduras’ ousted President Manuel Zelaya today, the State Department announced that Clinton has decided to terminate U.S. assistance to Honduras. Clinton had previously suspended U.S. assistance to the Central American state in the wake of the June 28 coup.

Negotiations led by Costan Rican President Oscar Arias under the auspices of the Organization of American States broke down last month, after Honduras’ de facto leader Roberto Michelleti rejected efforts to allow Zelaya to return to power before Honduras’ November elections.

The State Department further said that it was in the process of revoking the visas of identified members and supporters of Michelleti’s de facto regime.

"Restoration of the terminated assistance will be predicated upon a return to democratic, constitutional governance in Honduras," the State Department said.

At stake for Honduras, approximately $18 million in U.S. assistance, reports estimate.

After Secretary of State Hillary Clinton met with Honduras’ ousted President Manuel Zelaya today, the State Department announced that Clinton has decided to terminate U.S. assistance to Honduras. Clinton had previously suspended U.S. assistance to the Central American state in the wake of the June 28 coup.

Negotiations led by Costan Rican President Oscar Arias under the auspices of the Organization of American States broke down last month, after Honduras’ de facto leader Roberto Michelleti rejected efforts to allow Zelaya to return to power before Honduras’ November elections.

The State Department further said that it was in the process of revoking the visas of identified members and supporters of Michelleti’s de facto regime.

"Restoration of the terminated assistance will be predicated upon a return to democratic, constitutional governance in Honduras," the State Department said.

At stake for Honduras, approximately $18 million in U.S. assistance, reports estimate.

Laura Rozen writes The Cable daily at ForeignPolicy.com.

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