The Cable

The Cable goes inside the foreign policy machine, from Foggy Bottom to Turtle Bay, the White House to Embassy Row.

Hill staffers to watch

Keep your eye on these Capitol Hill staffers, all of whom were selected for the fall Congressional Fellowship Program at the Partnership for a Secure America, a centrist, security-minded policy organization here in Washington. PSA, which is advised by former Democratic national security advisors Zbigniew Brzezinski and Samuel Berger, as well as former GOP Senators ...

Keep your eye on these Capitol Hill staffers, all of whom were selected for the fall Congressional Fellowship Program at the Partnership for a Secure America, a centrist, security-minded policy organization here in Washington.

Keep your eye on these Capitol Hill staffers, all of whom were selected for the fall Congressional Fellowship Program at the Partnership for a Secure America, a centrist, security-minded policy organization here in Washington.

PSA, which is advised by former Democratic national security advisors Zbigniew Brzezinski and Samuel Berger, as well as former GOP Senators Howard Baker and Slade Gorton, has been putting out policy statements on issues ranging from climate change to non-proliferation.

"Over the past two decades destructive partisanship has invaded every level of the policymaking process in Washington, threatening our ability to respond to critical national security and foreign policy challenges," reads a backgrounder on the fellowship program (pdf).

PSA will announce the list of fall fellows sometime in the next couple of days, but The Cable has them here.

"This tells me that bipartisanship is not as much of a myth as some think, but actually exists on many different levels in Washington and is a goal that many see as worthwhile," said program manager Joel Meyer.

Names below the jump:

House Fellows
James P. Fenlon – Office of Congressman Tom Petri (R-WI)
Liam Fitzsimmons – Office of Congressman Maurice Hinchey (D-NY)
Scott Graves – Office of Congressman Mike Conaway (R-TX)
Brent Hall – Office of Congressman John Campbell (R-CA)
Jehmal Hudson – U.S. House of Representatives Democratic Caucus, Chairman John B. Larson (D-CT)
Travis Moore – Office of Congressman Henry A. Waxman (D-CA)
Aysha House Moshi – Office of Congressman Alan Grayson (D-FL)
Laura Mszar – Office of Congressman Louie Gohmert (R-TX)
Edward Parkinson – U.S. House Committee on Homeland Security, Ranking Member Peter T. King (R-NY)
Kerri Elizabeth Price – Office of Congressman Jeff Fortenberry (R-NE)
Asi Ofosu – Office of Congresswoman Carolyn C. Kilpatrick (D-MI)
Kristal Quarker – Office of Congressman Thaddeus G. McCotter (R-MI)
Katy Quinn – Office of Congressman Adam Smith (D-WA)
Aprille C. Raabe – Office of Congressman Don Young (R-AK)
Liza Reiderman – Office of Congressman Bart Stupak (D-MI)
Casey C. Street – Office of Congressman Jeff Miller (R-FL)
Aaron Wasserman – Office of Congressman Steve L. Driehaus (D-OH)

Senate Fellows
Arex B. Avanni – U.S. Senate Committee on Appropriations, Subcommittee on Homeland Security, Chairman Robert C. Byrd (D-WV)
Adam Barker – U.S. Senate Committee on Armed Services, Ranking Member John S. McCain (R-AZ)
Abigail Collazo – Office of Senator Amy Klobuchar (D-MN)
Joshua Carter – Office of Senator Sam Brownback (R-KS)
Sarah Drake – Office of Senator Roger Wicker (R-MS)
James M. Freeman – Office of Senator Roland W. Burris (D-IL)
Joshua Kremer – Office of Senator Christopher S. Bond (R-MO)
Scott Levin – U.S. Senate Committee on Rules and Administration, Chairman Charles E. Schumer (D-NY)
Derrick K. Nayo – Office of Senator Al Franken (D-MN)
Sally Rey – Office of Senator Lisa Murkowski (R-AK)
Grace Smitham – Office of Senator John Cornyn (R-TX)
Joel C. Spangenberg – U.S. Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs, Subcommittee on Oversight of Government Management, Chairman Daniel K. Akaka (D-HI)

Josh Rogin covers national security and foreign policy and writes the daily Web column The Cable. His column appears bi-weekly in the print edition of The Washington Post. He can be reached for comments or tips at josh.rogin@foreignpolicy.com.

Previously, Josh covered defense and foreign policy as a staff writer for Congressional Quarterly, writing extensively on Iraq, Afghanistan, Guantánamo Bay, U.S.-Asia relations, defense budgeting and appropriations, and the defense lobbying and contracting industries. Prior to that, he covered military modernization, cyber warfare, space, and missile defense for Federal Computer Week Magazine. He has also served as Pentagon Staff Reporter for the Asahi Shimbun, Japan's leading daily newspaper, in its Washington, D.C., bureau, where he reported on U.S.-Japan relations, Chinese military modernization, the North Korean nuclear crisis, and more.

A graduate of George Washington University's Elliott School of International Affairs, Josh lived in Yokohama, Japan, and studied at Tokyo's Sophia University. He speaks conversational Japanese and has reported from the region. He has also worked at the House International Relations Committee, the Embassy of Japan, and the Brookings Institution.

Josh's reporting has been featured on CNN, MSNBC, C-Span, CBS, ABC, NPR, WTOP, and several other outlets. He was a 2008-2009 National Press Foundation's Paul Miller Washington Reporting Fellow, 2009 military reporting fellow with the Knight Center for Specialized Journalism and the 2011 recipient of the InterAction Award for Excellence in International Reporting. He hails from Philadelphia and lives in Washington, D.C. Twitter: @joshrogin

More from Foreign Policy

Russian President Vladimir Putin and Chinese President Xi Jinping give a toast during a reception following their talks at the Kremlin in Moscow on March 21.
Russian President Vladimir Putin and Chinese President Xi Jinping give a toast during a reception following their talks at the Kremlin in Moscow on March 21.

Can Russia Get Used to Being China’s Little Brother?

The power dynamic between Beijing and Moscow has switched dramatically.

Xi and Putin shake hands while carrying red folders.
Xi and Putin shake hands while carrying red folders.

Xi and Putin Have the Most Consequential Undeclared Alliance in the World

It’s become more important than Washington’s official alliances today.

Russian President Vladimir Putin greets Kazakh President Kassym-Jomart Tokayev.
Russian President Vladimir Putin greets Kazakh President Kassym-Jomart Tokayev.

It’s a New Great Game. Again.

Across Central Asia, Russia’s brand is tainted by Ukraine, China’s got challenges, and Washington senses another opening.

Kurdish military officers take part in a graduation ceremony in Erbil, the capital of Iraq’s Kurdistan Region, on Jan. 15.
Kurdish military officers take part in a graduation ceremony in Erbil, the capital of Iraq’s Kurdistan Region, on Jan. 15.

Iraqi Kurdistan’s House of Cards Is Collapsing

The region once seemed a bright spot in the disorder unleashed by U.S. regime change. Today, things look bleak.