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Zelaya says he’s being tortured by Israeli mercenaries

Ousted Honduran President Manuel Zelaya tells the Miami Herald that he’s being tortured and fears for his life: He’s sleeping on chairs, and he claims his throat is sore from toxic gases and "Israeli mercenaries” are torturing him with high-frequency radiation. "We are being threatened with death,” he said in an interview with The Miami ...

Ousted Honduran President Manuel Zelaya tells the Miami Herald that he’s being tortured and fears for his life:

He’s sleeping on chairs, and he claims his throat is sore from toxic gases and "Israeli mercenaries” are torturing him with high-frequency radiation.

"We are being threatened with death,” he said in an interview with The Miami Herald, adding that mercenaries were likely to storm the embassy where he has been holed up since Monday and assassinate him.

"I prefer to march on my feet than to live on my knees before a military dictatorship,” Zelaya said in a series of back-to-back interviews.

Zelaya was deposed at gunpoint on June 28 and slipped back into his country on Monday, just two days before he was scheduled to speak before the United Nations. He sought refuge at the Brazilian Embassy, where Zelaya said he is being subjected to toxic gases and radiation that alter his physical and mental state.

Witnesses said that for a short time Tuesday morning, soldiers used a device that looked like a large satellite dish to emit a loud shrill noise.

It’s not quite clear from the article how Zelaya knows about the mysterious Israelis. Israeli government sources have denied involvement. 

Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez referred to Israeli complicity in the Honduran coup during his address to the General Assembly during the general assembly. At the press conference following the speech, a Herald reporter asked him if he could corroborate Zelaya’s story. Chavez said he had no proof but had "no reason to doubt a serious man like Zelaya." 

 Twitter: @joshuakeating

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