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African states protest Madagascar coup leader’s presence at U.N.

Later this afternoon, Madagascar President Andry Rajoelina will address the General Assembly here in New York, but some don’t want him here at all. Rajoelina took power in a military-backed coup in March, toppling then leader Marc Ravalomanana. The two leader signed an internationally-mediated power-sharing deal in August, but Rajoelina unilaterally disolved it this month.  ...

Later this afternoon, Madagascar President Andry Rajoelina will address the General Assembly here in New York, but some don't want him here at all. Rajoelina took power in a military-backed coup in March, toppling then leader Marc Ravalomanana. The two leader signed an internationally-mediated power-sharing deal in August, but Rajoelina unilaterally disolved it this month. 

General Assembly President Ali Treki met with foreign from the Southern Afircan Development Community -- which has refused to recognize Rajoelina's government -- after the foreign minister of the Democratic Republic of the Congo wrote a letter to him protesting Rajoelina's presence at the assembly.

The U.N. maintains that the invitation was not a reflection on Rajoelina's legitimacy and that the president was invited to participate in the climate summit earlier this week. 

Later this afternoon, Madagascar President Andry Rajoelina will address the General Assembly here in New York, but some don’t want him here at all. Rajoelina took power in a military-backed coup in March, toppling then leader Marc Ravalomanana. The two leader signed an internationally-mediated power-sharing deal in August, but Rajoelina unilaterally disolved it this month. 

General Assembly President Ali Treki met with foreign from the Southern Afircan Development Community — which has refused to recognize Rajoelina’s government — after the foreign minister of the Democratic Republic of the Congo wrote a letter to him protesting Rajoelina’s presence at the assembly.

The U.N. maintains that the invitation was not a reflection on Rajoelina’s legitimacy and that the president was invited to participate in the climate summit earlier this week. 

Joshua Keating was an associate editor at Foreign Policy  Twitter: @joshuakeating

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