As ‘president,’ Clinton leads U.N. effort against wartime rape

Hillary Clinton, Sept. 30, 2009 | STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images   Check out the signs in front of Secretary Clinton in the photo above: “President” and “United States.” Secretary Clinton got to preside over a session of the U.N. Security Council today because the United States holds the rotating presidency this month. She called for a ...

580175_090930_ClintonPresident2.jpg
580175_090930_ClintonPresident2.jpg

 

Check out the signs in front of Secretary Clinton in the photo above: "President" and "United States."

Secretary Clinton got to preside over a session of the U.N. Security Council today because the United States holds the rotating presidency this month. She called for a vote on a resolution to end wartime sexual violence, and it passed unanimously.

Hillary Clinton, Sept. 30, 2009 | STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images

Hillary Clinton, Sept. 30, 2009 | STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images
 

Check out the signs in front of Secretary Clinton in the photo above: “President” and “United States.”

Secretary Clinton got to preside over a session of the U.N. Security Council today because the United States holds the rotating presidency this month. She called for a vote on a resolution to end wartime sexual violence, and it passed unanimously.

Then in a speech, she declared:

Even though women and children are rarely responsible for initiating armed conflict, they are often war’s most vulnerable and violated victims.”

She also said: 

The dehumanizing nature of sexual violence doesn’t just harm a single individual or a single family or even a single village or a single group; it shreds the fabric that weaves us together as human beings.”

After Clinton ended the speech, a humorous moment (captured on this video) ensued. She said, “I resume now my function as president of the council. I kind of like being a president. So this may go on a little longer than anticipated.”

The diplomats laughed, and U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said, “Thank you, Madam President.”

In other Clinton-related news, American essayist and political activist Gore Vidal has revealed that he regrets shifting his support from Clinton to Barack Obama during last year’s Democratic presidential primary. In an interview with The Times of London, he said he thinks Clinton would have been a better president and said:

Hillary knows more about the world and what to do with the generals. History has proven when the girls get involved, they’re good at it. Elizabeth I knew Raleigh would be a good man to give a ship to.”

Photo: STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images

Preeti Aroon was copy chief at Foreign Policy from 2009 to 2016 and was an FP assistant editor from 2007 to 2009. Twitter: @pjaroonFP

More from Foreign Policy

An illustration shows George Kennan, the father of Cold War containment strategy.
An illustration shows George Kennan, the father of Cold War containment strategy.

Is Cold War Inevitable?

A new biography of George Kennan, the father of containment, raises questions about whether the old Cold War—and the emerging one with China—could have been avoided.

U.S. President Joe Biden speaks on the DISCLOSE Act.
U.S. President Joe Biden speaks on the DISCLOSE Act.

So You Want to Buy an Ambassadorship

The United States is the only Western government that routinely rewards mega-donors with top diplomatic posts.

Chinese President Xi jinping  toasts the guests during a banquet marking the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China on September 30, 2019 in Beijing, China.
Chinese President Xi jinping toasts the guests during a banquet marking the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China on September 30, 2019 in Beijing, China.

Can China Pull Off Its Charm Offensive?

Why Beijing’s foreign-policy reset will—or won’t—work out.

Turkish Defense Minister Hulusi Akar chairs a meeting in Ankara, Turkey on Nov. 21, 2022.
Turkish Defense Minister Hulusi Akar chairs a meeting in Ankara, Turkey on Nov. 21, 2022.

Turkey’s Problem Isn’t Sweden. It’s the United States.

Erdogan has focused on Stockholm’s stance toward Kurdish exile groups, but Ankara’s real demand is the end of U.S. support for Kurds in Syria.