Shadow Government

A front-row seat to the Republicans' debate over foreign policy, including their critique of the Biden administration.

Continuity of Shadow Government

By Christian Brose Well, everyone, I’m sad to say this is my last day with Foreign Policy. On Monday, I will begin a new job as the national security advisor to Sen. John McCain. I am honored and humbled by the opportunity, but moving on is bittersweet. Over the past year, I’ve had a chance ...

By Christian Brose

Well, everyone, I'm sad to say this is my last day with Foreign Policy. On Monday, I will begin a new job as the national security advisor to Sen. John McCain. I am honored and humbled by the opportunity, but moving on is bittersweet. Over the past year, I've had a chance to help re-launch Foreign Policy with a tremendous group of people: Susan Glasser, Moises Naim, Blake Hounshell, and all of the junior editors, who are the real brains of this operation (but don't tell anyone). In just one year -- a year, I would add, that hasn't been kind to the economy, and especially the long-suffering media industry -- we have expanded Foreign Policy's revenue over last year, added subscribers to our award-winning magazine, and built the new ForeignPolicy.com into the single best website in the business devoted to global politics, economics, and ideas. And that is still just the beginning of what this institution will achieve in the years to come.

By Christian Brose

Well, everyone, I’m sad to say this is my last day with Foreign Policy. On Monday, I will begin a new job as the national security advisor to Sen. John McCain. I am honored and humbled by the opportunity, but moving on is bittersweet. Over the past year, I’ve had a chance to help re-launch Foreign Policy with a tremendous group of people: Susan Glasser, Moises Naim, Blake Hounshell, and all of the junior editors, who are the real brains of this operation (but don’t tell anyone). In just one year — a year, I would add, that hasn’t been kind to the economy, and especially the long-suffering media industry — we have expanded Foreign Policy’s revenue over last year, added subscribers to our award-winning magazine, and built the new ForeignPolicy.com into the single best website in the business devoted to global politics, economics, and ideas. And that is still just the beginning of what this institution will achieve in the years to come.

On top of all that, it has been a real joy to write regularly and edit this blog, along with a truly amazing and experienced group of foreign policy practitioners-turned-bloggers. I have learned a great deal from all of them. I think the blog is more than living up to the mission we set for it. And most of all, I’ve had fun. That’s a great thing to say for any job.

This is my last post to Shadow Government. (I can already hear my own dedicated loyal opponents choking back their tears in the comments section.) But I am thrilled to say that the best days of this blog are most definitely ahead of it. Peter Feaver and Will Inboden, who have been star contributors in this blog’s first year, will assume my editorial responsibilities here at Shadow Government, effective immediately. We have already worked together to fulfill my long-standing desire to add a lot of smart new contributors to the current stable of terrific bloggers. Keep an eye out for the new arrivals in the days to come. You will be very impressed.

So Peter and Will are already well on their way to making Shadow Government an even better forum for practical, constructive commentary on U.S. foreign policy from experienced members of the loyal opposition. Consider that continuity in shadow government. I will remain a loyal fan and reader of this blog, and of ForeignPolicy.com. And who knows, maybe I’ll have a chance to come back at some point. If, that is, Peter and Will let me…

Christian Brose is a senior editor at Foreign Policy. He served as chief speechwriter and policy advisor for U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice from 2005 to 2008, and as speechwriter for former U.S. Secretary of State Colin Powell from 2004 to 2005.

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