If Mbeki’s shoe fits…

Former South African President Thabo Mbeki has been implicated in the corruption trial of former police chief — and former Interpol President — Jackie Selebi. Convicted drug trafficker named Glenn Agliotti alleges that Selebi warned him about a British police investigation in exchange for cash and gifts. Allegedly, Selebi didn’t forget his friends: Agliotti said ...

By , a former associate editor at Foreign Policy.
579675_091008_mbeki2.jpg
579675_091008_mbeki2.jpg
South Africa's former president Thabo Mbeki, heading an African Union (AU) panel on Darfur, addresses the media during a press conference in Khartoum on April 4, 2009. Mbeki, who arrived in Sudan on April 1, held talks with Sudanese officials on the country's conflict-ravaged Darfur region. Sudan expelled several aid groups from Darfur after the International Criminal Court issued in March an arrest warrant against President Omar al-Beshir, a decision opposed by the AU on grounds that it will jeopardise peace efforts in Africa's largest country. AFP PHOTO/ASHRAF SHAZLY (Photo credit should read ASHRAF SHAZLY/AFP/Getty Images)

Former South African President Thabo Mbeki has been implicated in the corruption trial of former police chief -- and former Interpol President -- Jackie Selebi. Convicted drug trafficker named Glenn Agliotti alleges that Selebi warned him about a British police investigation in exchange for cash and gifts. Allegedly, Selebi didn't forget his friends:

Agliotti said he had been asked during a shopping spree with Selebi to buy shoes for the former president.

"I bought shoes for the accused and one other person, ex President Thabo Mbeki. We were at Grays shopping, the accused said he was looking to buy a pair of shoes for the president."

Former South African President Thabo Mbeki has been implicated in the corruption trial of former police chief — and former Interpol President — Jackie Selebi. Convicted drug trafficker named Glenn Agliotti alleges that Selebi warned him about a British police investigation in exchange for cash and gifts. Allegedly, Selebi didn’t forget his friends:

Agliotti said he had been asked during a shopping spree with Selebi to buy shoes for the former president.

“I bought shoes for the accused and one other person, ex President Thabo Mbeki. We were at Grays shopping, the accused said he was looking to buy a pair of shoes for the president.”

“He indicated to the shop assistant that he needed to buy a size 7, if my memory serves me correctly, because the president had small and broad feet.”

Mbeki’s office was not immediately available for comment.

Critics of Mbeki accused him of protecting Selebi, suspended in 2008, despite repeated calls for his dismissal. Mbeki always rejected such accusations.

ASHRAF SHAZLY/AFP/Getty Images

Joshua Keating was an associate editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @joshuakeating

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