The Cable

The Cable goes inside the foreign policy machine, from Foggy Bottom to Turtle Bay, the White House to Embassy Row.

Briefing Skipper: Peace Prize, Steinberg, Aung San Suu Kyi, Ri Gun

In which we scour the transcript of the State Department’s daily presser so you don’t have to. Here are the highlights of today’s briefing by Assistant Secretary for Public Affairs P.J. Crowley:. Crowley weighs in on Obama’s Peace Prize win along the theme that he’s good because he’s the anti-Bush. "We think that this gives ...

In which we scour the transcript of the State Department's daily presser so you don't have to. Here are the highlights of today's briefing by Assistant Secretary for Public Affairs P.J. Crowley:.

Crowley weighs in on Obama's Peace Prize win along the theme that he's good because he's the anti-Bush. "We think that this gives us a sense of momentum when the United States has accolades tossed its way rather than shoes." Yuk, yuk.Secretary of State Hillary Clinton will be in Zurich tomorrow, then off to London, Ireland, and Russia. Deputy Secretary James Steinberg is on his way back from Bosnia, where he was talking EU reform at a meeting organized by Swedish Foreign Minister Carl Bildt. Special envoy George Mitchell is still in the Middle East.Crowley shook off the notion that Team Obama was looking for a way out of Afghanistan. "I have heard no U.S. government official, from the president, you know, down to your modest spokesman, say that there's anything but a -- a long-term commitment to the region and a long-term commitment to Afghanistan and Pakistan," he said.But he did say that the U.S. wouldn't mind if the Taliban became part of the Afghan political process. "If going forward the Afghan government ... chooses to engage in a political dialogue, and that dialogue brings people who are currently outside the political process if not attacking, you know, the political system that exists, in Afghanistan, to a position where they will choose to be invested in that process, we think, that would be a positive development."Past Nobel Peace Prize winner Aung San Suu Kyi was allowed out of her house arrest to meet with the U.S. chargé d'affaires, the British ambassador, and the Australian chargé d'affaires in Rangoon about Burma sanctions. No real readout from the meeting, but Crowley said the U.S. still wants her to be released.The State Department is considering whether to let North Korean official Ri Gun come to the U.S. for the Northeast Asia Cooperation Dialogue in California. Still no word on whether Stephen Bosworth will be able to go to Pyongyang or if a restart of the Six-Party Talks is any closer.

In which we scour the transcript of the State Department’s daily presser so you don’t have to. Here are the highlights of today’s briefing by Assistant Secretary for Public Affairs P.J. Crowley:.

  • Crowley weighs in on Obama’s Peace Prize win along the theme that he’s good because he’s the anti-Bush. "We think that this gives us a sense of momentum when the United States has accolades tossed its way rather than shoes." Yuk, yuk.
  • Secretary of State Hillary Clinton will be in Zurich tomorrow, then off to London, Ireland, and Russia. Deputy Secretary James Steinberg is on his way back from Bosnia, where he was talking EU reform at a meeting organized by Swedish Foreign Minister Carl Bildt. Special envoy George Mitchell is still in the Middle East.
  • Crowley shook off the notion that Team Obama was looking for a way out of Afghanistan. "I have heard no U.S. government official, from the president, you know, down to your modest spokesman, say that there’s anything but a — a long-term commitment to the region and a long-term commitment to Afghanistan and Pakistan," he said.
  • But he did say that the U.S. wouldn’t mind if the Taliban became part of the Afghan political process. "If going forward the Afghan government … chooses to engage in a political dialogue, and that dialogue brings people who are currently outside the political process if not attacking, you know, the political system that exists, in Afghanistan, to a position where they will choose to be invested in that process, we think, that would be a positive development."
  • Past Nobel Peace Prize winner Aung San Suu Kyi was allowed out of her house arrest to meet with the U.S. chargé d’affaires, the British ambassador, and the Australian chargé d’affaires in Rangoon about Burma sanctions. No real readout from the meeting, but Crowley said the U.S. still wants her to be released.
  • The State Department is considering whether to let North Korean official Ri Gun come to the U.S. for the Northeast Asia Cooperation Dialogue in California. Still no word on whether Stephen Bosworth will be able to go to Pyongyang or if a restart of the Six-Party Talks is any closer.

Josh Rogin covers national security and foreign policy and writes the daily Web column The Cable. His column appears bi-weekly in the print edition of The Washington Post. He can be reached for comments or tips at josh.rogin@foreignpolicy.com.

Previously, Josh covered defense and foreign policy as a staff writer for Congressional Quarterly, writing extensively on Iraq, Afghanistan, Guantánamo Bay, U.S.-Asia relations, defense budgeting and appropriations, and the defense lobbying and contracting industries. Prior to that, he covered military modernization, cyber warfare, space, and missile defense for Federal Computer Week Magazine. He has also served as Pentagon Staff Reporter for the Asahi Shimbun, Japan's leading daily newspaper, in its Washington, D.C., bureau, where he reported on U.S.-Japan relations, Chinese military modernization, the North Korean nuclear crisis, and more.

A graduate of George Washington University's Elliott School of International Affairs, Josh lived in Yokohama, Japan, and studied at Tokyo's Sophia University. He speaks conversational Japanese and has reported from the region. He has also worked at the House International Relations Committee, the Embassy of Japan, and the Brookings Institution.

Josh's reporting has been featured on CNN, MSNBC, C-Span, CBS, ABC, NPR, WTOP, and several other outlets. He was a 2008-2009 National Press Foundation's Paul Miller Washington Reporting Fellow, 2009 military reporting fellow with the Knight Center for Specialized Journalism and the 2011 recipient of the InterAction Award for Excellence in International Reporting. He hails from Philadelphia and lives in Washington, D.C. Twitter: @joshrogin

More from Foreign Policy

The Pentagon is seen from the air over Washington, D.C., on Aug. 25, 2013.

The Pentagon’s Office Culture Is Stuck in 1968

The U.S. national security bureaucracy needs a severe upgrade.

The Azerbaijani army patrols the streets of Shusha on Sept. 25 under a sign that reads: "Dear Shusha, you are free. Dear Shusha, we are back. Dear Shusha, we will resurrect you. Shusha is ours."

From the Ruins of War, a Tourist Resort Emerges

Shusha was the key to the recent war between Azerbaijan and Armenia. Now Baku wants to turn the fabled fortress town into a resort.

Frances Pugh in 2019's Midsommar.

Scandinavia’s Horror Renaissance and the Global Appeal of ‘Fakelore’

“Midsommar” and “The Ritual” are steeped in Scandinavian folklore. Or are they?