Clinton heads to Europe

Hillary Clinton, Feb. 18, 2009 | BAY ISMOYO/AFP/Getty Images Later today, Clinton heads to Europe, where she’ll visit the following places and do the following things: Zurich, Switzerland: She will attend the signing of two protocols between Turkey and Armenia that pave the way toward normalization of their relations. London: Clinton will meet with senior ...

579618_091009_ClintonPlane2.jpg
579618_091009_ClintonPlane2.jpg

Later today, Clinton heads to Europe, where she'll visit the following places and do the following things:

Zurich, Switzerland: She will attend the signing of two protocols between Turkey and Armenia that pave the way toward normalization of their relations.

London: Clinton will meet with senior British officials to discuss important issues such as Iran, Afghanistan, and Pakistan.

Hillary Clinton, Feb. 18, 2009 | BAY ISMOYO/AFP/Getty Images

Hillary Clinton, Feb. 18, 2009 | BAY ISMOYO/AFP/Getty Images
Later today, Clinton heads to Europe, where she’ll visit the following places and do the following things:

Zurich, Switzerland: She will attend the signing of two protocols between Turkey and Armenia that pave the way toward normalization of their relations.

London: Clinton will meet with senior British officials to discuss important issues such as Iran, Afghanistan, and Pakistan.

Dublin, Ireland: She will reaffirm the United States’ commitment to Ireland during meetings with senior Irish officials.

Belfast, Northern Ireland: Clinton will emphasize the United States’ support for political progress and economic recovery in the area.

Moscow: As part of her efforts to reset relations with Russia, she’ll meet with President Dmitry Medvedev and Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov to discuss a successor agreement to START, the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty. They’ll also discuss Afghanistan, Iran, the Middle East, and North Korea.

Kazan, Russia: Clinton will visit Kazan, the capital of Tatarstan, to talk with local officials and religious leaders about promoting tolerance and interfaith dialogue. The city has a large Muslim population, and yesterday, in this clumsy exchange, State Department spokesman Ian Kelly said Kazan “really shows that the Russian Federation is a multiethnic country.”

Bon voyage, Secretary Clinton!

Photo: BAY ISMOYO/AFP/Getty Images

Preeti Aroon was copy chief at Foreign Policy from 2009 to 2016 and was an FP assistant editor from 2007 to 2009. Twitter: @pjaroonFP

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