Clinton plays peacemaker in N. Ireland

Hillary Clinton, Peter Robinson, Martin McGuinness, Oct. 12, 2009 | Paul Faith - WPA Pool/Getty Images   Secretary Clinton, whose husband Bill helped broker the 1998 Good Friday agreement, continued the peace process today with a talk to the Northern Ireland Assembly. She encouraged the Catholic and Protestant lawmakers to strengthen their power-sharing partnership, stating ...

579500_091012_ClintonNorthernIreland2.jpg
579500_091012_ClintonNorthernIreland2.jpg
BELFAST - OCTOBER 12: U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, poses with Northern Ireland's First Minister Peter Robinson (L) and Deputy First Minister Martin McGuinness (R), at Stormont Castle on October 12, 2009 in Belfast, United Kingdom. Clinton is on a five-day tour of Europe and Russia. (Photo by Paul Faith - WPA Pool/Getty Images)

 

Secretary Clinton, whose husband Bill helped broker the 1998 Good Friday agreement, continued the peace process today with a talk to the Northern Ireland Assembly. She encouraged the Catholic and Protestant lawmakers to strengthen their power-sharing partnership, stating that it shows that even the most acrimonious conflicts can be reconciled through patient compromise.

She also met today with Northern Ireland's first minister, Peter Robinson, above left, and Martin McGuinness, the deputy first minister.

Hillary Clinton, Peter Robinson, Martin McGuinness, Oct. 12, 2009 | Paul Faith - WPA Pool/Getty Images

Hillary Clinton, Peter Robinson, Martin McGuinness, Oct. 12, 2009 | Paul Faith - WPA Pool/Getty Images
 

Secretary Clinton, whose husband Bill helped broker the 1998 Good Friday agreement, continued the peace process today with a talk to the Northern Ireland Assembly. She encouraged the Catholic and Protestant lawmakers to strengthen their power-sharing partnership, stating that it shows that even the most acrimonious conflicts can be reconciled through patient compromise.

She also met today with Northern Ireland’s first minister, Peter Robinson, above left, and Martin McGuinness, the deputy first minister.

In an editorial titled, “Mrs Clinton’s Visit Very Welcome,” the Belfast Telegraph lauded Clinton’s involvement in the peace process — dating back to her time as first lady — and stated, “Hillary Clinton deserves our thanks for all she has done, and is still doing, to make a permanent peace possible.”

(Sounds like Clinton’s been doing a lot more to broker peace lately than the Nobel-winning Obama.)

Photo: Paul Faith – WPA Pool/Getty Images

Preeti Aroon was copy chief at Foreign Policy from 2009 to 2016 and was an FP assistant editor from 2007 to 2009. Twitter: @pjaroonFP

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