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Medvedev’s vote rejected

It seems that Karma is alive and well in the universe. Allegations of fraud have surrounded recent elections in Russia. In 2007, in what has been described as “the least democratic election since the USSR collapsed,” opposition parties alleged that campaign literature was seized and candidates were excluded from the ballot; The Kremlin apparently forced ...

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It seems that Karma is alive and well in the universe.

Allegations of fraud have surrounded recent elections in Russia. In 2007, in what has been described as “the least democratic election since the USSR collapsed,” opposition parties alleged that campaign literature was seized and candidates were excluded from the ballot; The Kremlin apparently forced millions of public workers to vote; and a senior election official reported that he was instructed to make sure that United Russia, the ruling party, received double the number of votes expected — the claim of rigging is strongly supported by a number of statistical anomalies.

The 2008 election of President Dmitry Medvedev also had plenty of allegations of stacking the deck; including further claims that public employees were pushed to vote for Putin’s favorite, that local officials were told to produce a strong majority on Medvedev’s behalf, and that potentially strong opponents were excluded from the ballot.

Yesterday, elections for a new city council in Moscow were held, and it should come as little surprise that there have already been more allegations of fraud. But even if Medvedev had a hand in ensuring the re-election of the sitting mayor, a member of the United Russia party, there was a twist of poetic justice. The president struggled to vote — an electronic box repeatedly refused to take Medvedev’s ballot.

Photo: VLADIMIR RODIONOV/AFP/Getty Images

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