Clinton talks Iran in Russia

Hillary Clinton, Sergei Lavrov, Oct. 13, 2009 | ALEXANDER NEMENOV/AFP/Getty Images   Secretary Clinton discussed Iran with Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov in Moscow today. As one senior U.S. official put it, Clinton wanted to know “what specific forms of pressure Russia would be prepared” to join the United States in if Iran didn’t keep ...

579370_091013_ClintonLavrov2.jpg
579370_091013_ClintonLavrov2.jpg

 

Secretary Clinton discussed Iran with Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov in Moscow today. As one senior U.S. official put it, Clinton wanted to know "what specific forms of pressure Russia would be prepared" to join the United States in if Iran didn't keep its promises about not developing nuclear weapons.

Lavrov proved tough, though, and didn't pledge tougher sanctions against Iran, stating at a news conference afterward that sanctions would be counterproductive at this point. "All forces should be aimed at supporting talks," he said.

Hillary Clinton, Sergei Lavrov, Oct. 13, 2009 | ALEXANDER NEMENOV/AFP/Getty Images

Hillary Clinton, Sergei Lavrov, Oct. 13, 2009 | ALEXANDER NEMENOV/AFP/Getty Images
 

Secretary Clinton discussed Iran with Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov in Moscow today. As one senior U.S. official put it, Clinton wanted to know “what specific forms of pressure Russia would be prepared” to join the United States in if Iran didn’t keep its promises about not developing nuclear weapons.

Lavrov proved tough, though, and didn’t pledge tougher sanctions against Iran, stating at a news conference afterward that sanctions would be counterproductive at this point. “All forces should be aimed at supporting talks,” he said.

Clinton doesn’t support tougher sanctions at this time either, saying at the news conference, “But we are not at that point yet. That is not a conclusion we have reached. And we want to be very clear that it is our preference that Iran works with the international community … to fulfill its obligation on inspections.”

Clinton said that overall her discussion with Lavrov was “very comprehensive and productive.” “I feel very good about the so-called reset,” she said.

Clinton met later with human rights activists and opposition journalists and concluded her day by attending the opera The Love for Three Oranges at the Bolshoi Theatre.

Photo: ALEXANDER NEMENOV/AFP/Getty Images

Preeti Aroon was copy chief at Foreign Policy from 2009 to 2016 and was an FP assistant editor from 2007 to 2009. Twitter: @pjaroonFP

More from Foreign Policy

A Panzerhaubitze 2000 tank howitzer fires during a mission in Ukraine’s Donetsk region.
A Panzerhaubitze 2000 tank howitzer fires during a mission in Ukraine’s Donetsk region.

Lessons for the Next War

Twelve experts weigh in on how to prevent, deter, and—if necessary—fight the next conflict.

An illustration showing a torn Russian flag and Russian President Vladimir Putin.
An illustration showing a torn Russian flag and Russian President Vladimir Putin.

It’s High Time to Prepare for Russia’s Collapse

Not planning for the possibility of disintegration betrays a dangerous lack of imagination.

An unexploded tail section of a cluster bomb is seen in Ukraine.
An unexploded tail section of a cluster bomb is seen in Ukraine.

Turkey Is Sending Cold War-Era Cluster Bombs to Ukraine

The artillery-fired cluster munitions could be lethal to Russian troops—and Ukrainian civilians.

A joint session of Congress meets to count the Electoral College vote from the 2008 presidential election the House Chamber in the U.S. Capitol  January 8, 2009 in Washington.
A joint session of Congress meets to count the Electoral College vote from the 2008 presidential election the House Chamber in the U.S. Capitol January 8, 2009 in Washington.

Congrats, You’re a Member of Congress. Now Listen Up.

Some brief foreign-policy advice for the newest members of the U.S. legislature.