The Cable

The Cable goes inside the foreign policy machine, from Foggy Bottom to Turtle Bay, the White House to Embassy Row.

What’s news this morning?

Vice President Joseph Biden isn’t the only one warning against a troop escalation in Afghanistan, but he does face opposition from Senate Appropriations Committee chairman Daniel Inouye, who came out yesterday in support of a full counterinsurgency strategy. Afghan President Hamid Karzai is also on board with the McChrystal plan, but still doesn’t think there ...

Vice President Joseph Biden isn't the only one warning against a troop escalation in Afghanistan, but he does face opposition from Senate Appropriations Committee chairman Daniel Inouye, who came out yesterday in support of a full counterinsurgency strategy.

Vice President Joseph Biden isn’t the only one warning against a troop escalation in Afghanistan, but he does face opposition from Senate Appropriations Committee chairman Daniel Inouye, who came out yesterday in support of a full counterinsurgency strategy.

Afghan President Hamid Karzai is also on board with the McChrystal plan, but still doesn’t think there was widespread fraud in his recent election.

The Washington Post reports that President Obama will sign the Pakistan aid bill today after Congress makes nice about the conditions on the money, but Politico reports not so fast.

Looks like Moscow won’t support Washington’s position on Iran sanctions after all. (Good thing the U.S. decision to alter missile-defense plans in Eastern Europe had nothing to do with Russia.)

Regardless, the House of Representatives will pass a limited sanctions measure on Iran today.

Josh Rogin covers national security and foreign policy and writes the daily Web column The Cable. His column appears bi-weekly in the print edition of The Washington Post. He can be reached for comments or tips at josh.rogin@foreignpolicy.com.

Previously, Josh covered defense and foreign policy as a staff writer for Congressional Quarterly, writing extensively on Iraq, Afghanistan, Guantánamo Bay, U.S.-Asia relations, defense budgeting and appropriations, and the defense lobbying and contracting industries. Prior to that, he covered military modernization, cyber warfare, space, and missile defense for Federal Computer Week Magazine. He has also served as Pentagon Staff Reporter for the Asahi Shimbun, Japan's leading daily newspaper, in its Washington, D.C., bureau, where he reported on U.S.-Japan relations, Chinese military modernization, the North Korean nuclear crisis, and more.

A graduate of George Washington University's Elliott School of International Affairs, Josh lived in Yokohama, Japan, and studied at Tokyo's Sophia University. He speaks conversational Japanese and has reported from the region. He has also worked at the House International Relations Committee, the Embassy of Japan, and the Brookings Institution.

Josh's reporting has been featured on CNN, MSNBC, C-Span, CBS, ABC, NPR, WTOP, and several other outlets. He was a 2008-2009 National Press Foundation's Paul Miller Washington Reporting Fellow, 2009 military reporting fellow with the Knight Center for Specialized Journalism and the 2011 recipient of the InterAction Award for Excellence in International Reporting. He hails from Philadelphia and lives in Washington, D.C. Twitter: @joshrogin

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