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CNAS signs up Schmitt and Shanker

The Center for a New American Security, the newest and most aggressive defense think tank on the block, announced today it will host two top New York Times reporters, Eric Schmitt and Thom Shanker, beginning in November. The new "writers in residence" will use their time to work on a joint book project entitled, Counterstrike, ...

The Center for a New American Security, the newest and most aggressive defense think tank on the block, announced today it will host two top New York Times reporters, Eric Schmitt and Thom Shanker, beginning in November.

The new "writers in residence" will use their time to work on a joint book project entitled, Counterstrike, which CNAS describes as "an examination of the evolution of American counterterrorism strategy since the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001."

Shanker will take a three-month leave from the Times starting in November, and Schmitt will follow with a three-month stint in February.

The Center for a New American Security, the newest and most aggressive defense think tank on the block, announced today it will host two top New York Times reporters, Eric Schmitt and Thom Shanker, beginning in November.

The new "writers in residence" will use their time to work on a joint book project entitled, Counterstrike, which CNAS describes as "an examination of the evolution of American counterterrorism strategy since the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001."

Shanker will take a three-month leave from the Times starting in November, and Schmitt will follow with a three-month stint in February.

"Thom and I believe there’s a rich story to tell about the significant evolution of American counterterrorism strategy and policy since the Sept. 11 attacks that reflects both a more detailed understanding of terrorist networks and a healthier appreciation of their deadly resiliency," Schmitt said in an e-mail.

CNAS, which has been a feeder for national security and foreign-policy positions in the Obama administration, has been expanding its ranks steadily. Recent acquisitions include Richard Fontaine, former national security advisor to John McCain, the National Defense University’s Patrick Cronin, and former writer in residence and fellow FP blogger Tom Ricks.

Other past CNAS writers include the TimesDavid Sanger, former Times and Politico correspondent David Cloud, and Ricks’ replacement at the Washington Post, former Wall Street Journal defense writer Greg Jaffe.

In other CNAS news this week, former president Michèle Flournoy and current CEO Nate Fick made GQ‘s list of the 50 most powerful people in DC, coming in at number 20 and 42, respectively.

Josh Rogin covers national security and foreign policy and writes the daily Web column The Cable. His column appears bi-weekly in the print edition of The Washington Post. He can be reached for comments or tips at josh.rogin@foreignpolicy.com.

Previously, Josh covered defense and foreign policy as a staff writer for Congressional Quarterly, writing extensively on Iraq, Afghanistan, Guantánamo Bay, U.S.-Asia relations, defense budgeting and appropriations, and the defense lobbying and contracting industries. Prior to that, he covered military modernization, cyber warfare, space, and missile defense for Federal Computer Week Magazine. He has also served as Pentagon Staff Reporter for the Asahi Shimbun, Japan's leading daily newspaper, in its Washington, D.C., bureau, where he reported on U.S.-Japan relations, Chinese military modernization, the North Korean nuclear crisis, and more.

A graduate of George Washington University's Elliott School of International Affairs, Josh lived in Yokohama, Japan, and studied at Tokyo's Sophia University. He speaks conversational Japanese and has reported from the region. He has also worked at the House International Relations Committee, the Embassy of Japan, and the Brookings Institution.

Josh's reporting has been featured on CNN, MSNBC, C-Span, CBS, ABC, NPR, WTOP, and several other outlets. He was a 2008-2009 National Press Foundation's Paul Miller Washington Reporting Fellow, 2009 military reporting fellow with the Knight Center for Specialized Journalism and the 2011 recipient of the InterAction Award for Excellence in International Reporting. He hails from Philadelphia and lives in Washington, D.C. Twitter: @joshrogin

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