Clinton to be on Jim Lehrer’s NewsHour tonight!

Hillary Clinton, Islamabad, Oct. 30, 2009 | STR/AFP/Getty Images   Secretary Clinton, above talking with Pakistanis in Islamabad today, will be on PBS’s NewsHour with Jim Lehrer tonight (check local listings for the exact time). She was interviewed in Islamabad today by the NewsHour‘s Margaret Warner. I’ve read the transcript, and Clinton says a lot of important ...

577947_091030_ClintonIslamabad2.jpg
577947_091030_ClintonIslamabad2.jpg

 

Secretary Clinton, above talking with Pakistanis in Islamabad today, will be on PBS's NewsHour with Jim Lehrer tonight (check local listings for the exact time). She was interviewed in Islamabad today by the NewsHour's Margaret Warner. I've read the transcript, and Clinton says a lot of important things about her time in Pakistan this week and U.S. and Pakistani efforts to go after extremists. I'm not allowed to post the entire transcript, but here's how the interview begins:

Warner: Secretary Clinton, thanks for being with us. Now you've been to Pakistan many times but never as Secretary of State, never at such a volatile time.

Hillary Clinton, Islamabad, Oct. 30, 2009 | STR/AFP/Getty Images

Hillary Clinton, Islamabad, Oct. 30, 2009 | STR/AFP/Getty Images
 

Secretary Clinton, above talking with Pakistanis in Islamabad today, will be on PBS’s NewsHour with Jim Lehrer tonight (check local listings for the exact time). She was interviewed in Islamabad today by the NewsHour‘s Margaret Warner. I’ve read the transcript, and Clinton says a lot of important things about her time in Pakistan this week and U.S. and Pakistani efforts to go after extremists. I’m not allowed to post the entire transcript, but here’s how the interview begins:

Warner: Secretary Clinton, thanks for being with us. Now you’ve been to Pakistan many times but never as Secretary of State, never at such a volatile time.

Clinton: Right.

Warner: Was there anything unexpected that you found here? Something that you didn’t imagine?

Clinton: Well, Margaret it, it wasn’t that I found here anything unexpected. It was that I knew before I came that we had our work cut out for us, that there was a level of um, mistrust and misunderstanding uh that I wanted to tackle head-on. I have a great deal of admiration uh, for uh, the culture and the history and the struggle of the people of Pakistan. But what became clear in the time that I’ve been Secretary of State, is that there was an enormous number of questions about our motive, our intention, our actions that had been built up over the last 8 years. So I wanted to try to address those and go out and meet people and hear and listen and have a really, a good dialogue which I think we’ve had.

Photo: STR/AFP/Getty Images

Preeti Aroon was copy chief at Foreign Policy from 2009 to 2016 and was an FP assistant editor from 2007 to 2009. Twitter: @pjaroonFP

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