Thaksin glides around the globe and flim-flams every nation

Thailand peripatetic former Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra has turned up in Cambodia, where he has been named a special economic advisor to the government. As Thailand’s current government is seeking Thaksin extradition on corruption charges, they’re not too thrilled about this development and have recalled their ambassador from Cambodia: [Thai prime minister] Abhisit accused Cambodia ...

By , a former associate editor at Foreign Policy.
577481_091105_thaksin2.jpg
577481_091105_thaksin2.jpg
BANGKOK, THAILAND: Thai Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra displays his identification card prior to cast his vote at a polling booth close to his residence in down town Bangkok, 06 February 2005. Thaksin predicted a turnout of up to 70 percent in Thai elections Sunday, as he cast his ballot in the poll that is expected to give him a sweeping victory. AFP PHOTO/ SAEED KHAN (Photo credit should read SAEED KHAN/AFP/Getty Images)

Thailand peripatetic former Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra has turned up in Cambodia, where he has been named a special economic advisor to the government. As Thailand's current government is seeking Thaksin extradition on corruption charges, they're not too thrilled about this development and have recalled their ambassador from Cambodia:

[Thai prime minister] Abhisit accused Cambodia of interfering in Thailand's internal affairs, and a foreign ministry official said bilateral co-operation agreements would be reviewed.

"Last night's announcement by the Cambodian government harmed the Thai justice system and really affected Thai public sentiment," Mr Abhisit said.

Thailand peripatetic former Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra has turned up in Cambodia, where he has been named a special economic advisor to the government. As Thailand’s current government is seeking Thaksin extradition on corruption charges, they’re not too thrilled about this development and have recalled their ambassador from Cambodia:

[Thai prime minister] Abhisit accused Cambodia of interfering in Thailand’s internal affairs, and a foreign ministry official said bilateral co-operation agreements would be reviewed.

“Last night’s announcement by the Cambodian government harmed the Thai justice system and really affected Thai public sentiment,” Mr Abhisit said.

The Cambodian government claims they want to take advantage of Thaksin’s business expertise, though it’s likely also relishing the chance to irritate Thailand. The two countires have been engaged in border skirmishes in recent months.

It’s been an interesting year for Thaksin, who has demonstrated a Carmen Sandiego-like ability to generate controversy around the world while evading arrest. In April, he was named an honorary Nicaraguan ambassador and granted a passport by Daniel Ortega’s government. He was also granted a residency permit in Germany under false pretenses a few months later with a member of his entourage claiming to be German intelligence agent. 

So, gumshoes, where will Thaksin turn up next?

SAEED KHAN/AFP/Getty Image

Joshua Keating was an associate editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @joshuakeating

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