At Brandenburg Gate, Clinton issues ‘call to action’

Hillary Clinton, Nov. 9, 2009 | Andreas Rentz/Getty Images   Yesterday evening at the Brandenburg Gate in Berlin, Secretary Clinton once again declared that the 20th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall should serve as a “call to action” to “advance freedom” for the millions of people around the world who still face obstacles and lack ...

577232_091110_ClintonBerlinUmbrella2.jpg
577232_091110_ClintonBerlinUmbrella2.jpg
<> at Brandenburg Gate on November 9, 2009 in Berlin, Germany.

 

Yesterday evening at the Brandenburg Gate in Berlin, Secretary Clinton once again declared that the 20th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall should serve as a "call to action" to "advance freedom" for the millions of people around the world who still face obstacles and lack opportunity. In her remarks, she said:

Two decades later, we remember. But it is also a call to action. There are still millions across our world who are separated -- maybe not by walls, maybe not by barbed wire, although that still exists -- but who are separated from loved ones, who are kept down and behind, unable to fulfill their own destinies. So as beneficiaries of this great bequest we inherited in 1989, those of us gathered here tonight, leaders and citizens alike, we must pledge ourselves to work together to advance freedom beyond its current frontiers so that people everywhere are afforded the opportunities to pursue their dreams and live up to their God-given potential.

Hillary Clinton, Nov. 9, 2009 | Andreas Rentz/Getty Images

Hillary Clinton, Nov. 9, 2009 | Andreas Rentz/Getty Images
 

Yesterday evening at the Brandenburg Gate in Berlin, Secretary Clinton once again declared that the 20th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall should serve as a “call to action” to “advance freedom” for the millions of people around the world who still face obstacles and lack opportunity. In her remarks, she said:

Two decades later, we remember. But it is also a call to action. There are still millions across our world who are separated — maybe not by walls, maybe not by barbed wire, although that still exists — but who are separated from loved ones, who are kept down and behind, unable to fulfill their own destinies. So as beneficiaries of this great bequest we inherited in 1989, those of us gathered here tonight, leaders and citizens alike, we must pledge ourselves to work together to advance freedom beyond its current frontiers so that people everywhere are afforded the opportunities to pursue their dreams and live up to their God-given potential.

Above: Clinton reviews an honor guard carrying torches at Bellevue Palace — the home of the German president — in Berlin. 

Below: Clinton appears on the big screens that flanked the Brandenburg Gate yesterday. In front are some of the 1,000 giant dominoes that were toppled to symbolize the fall of the Berlin Wall. (Check out this cool video of the dominoes falling.)

Brandenburg Gate, Nov. 9, 2009 | WOLFGANG RATTAY/AFP/Getty Images

Brandenburg Gate, Nov. 9, 2009 | WOLFGANG RATTAY/AFP/Getty Images

Photos, top to bottom: Andreas Rentz/Getty Images, WOLFGANG RATTAY/AFP/Getty Images

Preeti Aroon was copy chief at Foreign Policy from 2009 to 2016 and was an FP assistant editor from 2007 to 2009. Twitter: @pjaroonFP

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