Clinton is in Singapore for APEC summit

Hillary Clinton, George Yeo, July 22, 2009 | PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images Secretary Clinton is on a new continent today — Asia. She arrived in Singapore late today (yes, it’s already late today in most of the world, while only early afternoon here in Washington) for the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit. (Above, she shakes hands with ...

577221_091110_ClintonSingaporeJuly2.jpg
577221_091110_ClintonSingaporeJuly2.jpg

Secretary Clinton is on a new continent today -- Asia. She arrived in Singapore late today (yes, it's already late today in most of the world, while only early afternoon here in Washington) for the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit. (Above, she shakes hands with Singaporean Foreign Affairs Minister George Yeo in Thailand this July.)

On Thursday, she'll head to the Philippines, where apparently some people plan to protest her (well, not so much her personally, but the United States more broadly). They are angered by the "indefinite" presence of U.S. troops in their country, with one leader of a leftist political coalition there saying in a statement, "[T]he United States is determined to strengthen and expand its presence in the Philippines. [Clinton's] trip is definitely not a goodwill or solidarity visit for typhoon victims. She's here for U.S. security interests, more than anything else." Well, I'm sure Clinton will take it in stride.

Hillary Clinton, George Yeo, July 22, 2009 | PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images

Hillary Clinton, George Yeo, July 22, 2009 | PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images

Secretary Clinton is on a new continent today — Asia. She arrived in Singapore late today (yes, it’s already late today in most of the world, while only early afternoon here in Washington) for the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit. (Above, she shakes hands with Singaporean Foreign Affairs Minister George Yeo in Thailand this July.)

On Thursday, she’ll head to the Philippines, where apparently some people plan to protest her (well, not so much her personally, but the United States more broadly). They are angered by the “indefinite” presence of U.S. troops in their country, with one leader of a leftist political coalition there saying in a statement, “[T]he United States is determined to strengthen and expand its presence in the Philippines. [Clinton’s] trip is definitely not a goodwill or solidarity visit for typhoon victims. She’s here for U.S. security interests, more than anything else.” Well, I’m sure Clinton will take it in stride.

On Friday, Clinton will be back in Singapore to join President Obama for more APEC summit. Then they’ll be in China Nov. 15 to 18.

Photo: PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images

Preeti Aroon was copy chief at Foreign Policy from 2009 to 2016 and was an FP assistant editor from 2007 to 2009. Twitter: @pjaroonFP

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