Obama might head to Copenhagen?

The headline on this story reads: “Obama will go to Copenhagen to clinch deal.” That’s a touch misleading. What the headline on this story should really read is: “Obama will go to Copenhagen if and only if his appearance is necessary in order to clinch a deal.” On one hand, this is good news. Even ...

577235_091110_928578772.jpg
577235_091110_928578772.jpg

The headline on this story reads: "Obama will go to Copenhagen to clinch deal."

That's a touch misleading.

The headline on this story reads: “Obama will go to Copenhagen to clinch deal.”

That’s a touch misleading.

What the headline on this story should really read is: “Obama will go to Copenhagen if and only if his appearance is necessary in order to clinch a deal.”

On one hand, this is good news. Even if the United States can’t be a strong party in climate change negotiations, it is of vital importance that Obama act as a strong diplomat and negotiator on this issue. The whole world is at stake.

On the other hand, isn’t this a bit rich? The U.S. slow-walk on this issue is part of the reason the Copenhagen negotiations have been so fraught. If a comprehensive agreement falters in December, the United States will be in no small part to blame. But its leader might parachute in at the last moment to save the day? Sigh.

LLUIS GENE/AFP/Getty Images

Annie Lowrey is assistant editor at FP.

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