Al Qaeda blames Blackwater for Peshawar bombings

Looks like Blackwater/Xe has joined the list of Al Qaeda’s favorite boogeymen. Mustafa Abu Yazid, the terror group’s chief of operations in Afghanistan, is blaming the contractor for the recent violence in Peshawar: The Mujahedeen, as Yazid called the militants, target only security forces who are far from civilian gathering places, he said. “Today, everyone ...

By , a former associate editor at Foreign Policy.
577008_091113_peshawar2.jpg
577008_091113_peshawar2.jpg
Pakistani security forces arrive to secure the site following a deadly car bomb blast at a market in Peshawar on October 28, 2009. A huge car bomb ripped through a bustling market in the northwestern city of Peshawar October 28 killing at least 86 people and underscoring the scale of the extremist threat facing Pakistan. The explosion detonated in a crowded street in the Meena Bazaar just hours after US Secretary Hillary Clinton arrived in Pakistan to bolster the two countries' troubled alliance against Taliban and Al-Qaeda militants. AFP PHOTO / A MAJEED (Photo credit should read A Majeed/AFP/Getty Images)

Looks like Blackwater/Xe has joined the list of Al Qaeda's favorite boogeymen. Mustafa Abu Yazid, the terror group's chief of operations in Afghanistan, is blaming the contractor for the recent violence in Peshawar:

The Mujahedeen, as Yazid called the militants, target only security forces who are far from civilian gathering places, he said.

"Today, everyone knows what Blackwater and the criminal security contractors are doing after they came to Pakistan with the support of the criminal, corrupt government and its intelligence and security apparatus," Yazid said.

Looks like Blackwater/Xe has joined the list of Al Qaeda’s favorite boogeymen. Mustafa Abu Yazid, the terror group’s chief of operations in Afghanistan, is blaming the contractor for the recent violence in Peshawar:

The Mujahedeen, as Yazid called the militants, target only security forces who are far from civilian gathering places, he said.

“Today, everyone knows what Blackwater and the criminal security contractors are doing after they came to Pakistan with the support of the criminal, corrupt government and its intelligence and security apparatus,” Yazid said.

“They are the ones who commit these heinous acts, then accuse the Mujahedeen of their crimes.”

A Majeed/AFP/Getty Images

Joshua Keating was an associate editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @joshuakeating

Tag: War

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