Best Defense

Thomas E. Ricks' daily take on national security.

Today’s best piece on Afghanistan

The best commentary on President Obama’s speech came, oddly enough, from a British newspaper. Clare “Hold-and-Build” Lockhart writes: President Obama has got it right. After taking his time to wrestle with the enormous challenge of defining the US national interest in Afghanistan and its region, he has provided a credible vision of ending the war, ...

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WEST POINT, NY - DECEMBER 01: U.S. President Barack Obama arrives to speak in Eisenhower Hall at the United States Military Academy at West Point December 1, 2009 in West Point, New York. President Obama delivered a crucial speech at the renowned military academy, during which he outlined his plan to send tens of thousands of additional troops to Afghanistan over the next six months, before transitioning forces out of the country beginning in 2011. (Photo by Roger L. Wollenberg-Pool/Getty Images)

The best commentary on President Obama's speech came, oddly enough, from a British newspaper. Clare "Hold-and-Build" Lockhart writes:

President Obama has got it right. After taking his time to wrestle with the enormous challenge of defining the US national interest in Afghanistan and its region, he has provided a credible vision of ending the war, stabilising the country and handing over responsibility to Afghan self-rule. His move away from fighting, endorsing General Stanley McChrystal's analysis, will protect the population and provide a security bridge while Afghan forces are trained."

The best commentary on President Obama’s speech came, oddly enough, from a British newspaper. Clare “Hold-and-Build” Lockhart writes:

President Obama has got it right. After taking his time to wrestle with the enormous challenge of defining the US national interest in Afghanistan and its region, he has provided a credible vision of ending the war, stabilising the country and handing over responsibility to Afghan self-rule. His move away from fighting, endorsing General Stanley McChrystal’s analysis, will protect the population and provide a security bridge while Afghan forces are trained.”

Roger L. Wollenberg-Pool/Getty Images

Thomas E. Ricks covered the U.S. military from 1991 to 2008 for the Wall Street Journal and then the Washington Post. He can be reached at ricksblogcomment@gmail.com. Twitter: @tomricks1

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