Passport

Pirates’ consumption patterns unchanged over the centuries

  The New York Times reports over the past two years a piece of land in Bossaso increased in price 66 percent, a pair of men’s shoes is up 150 percent. The reason? Pirates. It appears the massive amount of booty being swashbuckled by Somali pirates is having very real effects on the consumer market. ...

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The New York Times reports over the past two years a piece of land in Bossaso increased in price 66 percent, a pair of men’s shoes is up 150 percent. The reason? Pirates.

It appears the massive amount of booty being swashbuckled by Somali pirates is having very real effects on the consumer market.  In a sign that not much has changed in piracy over the past few centuries, the Somali pirates are spending their plunder on prostitutes, booze and drugs.

Last month alone, Somali pirates raked in over $3 million; and the E.U. reports that 11 ships are being held by pirates off the Somali coast, paydays waiting to happen.  This is translating to a giant disparity on the shore, as pirates drive around in luxury SUVs and don’t even bother to collect their change after buying something. People who can’t afford consumer goods often use the excuse, “we are not pirates.”

They’re not exactly romantics, though. ”Pirates do not waste time to woo women, but instead pay them a lot,” said Sahro Mohamed, owner of a beauty salon.

MOHAMED DAHIR/AFP/Getty Images

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