Are you smarter than a Fletcher School graduate student?

The following question was on the final exam for my Global Political Economy class this fall.  If you’re interested, provide a one paragraph answer in the comments.  I’ll report back later in the week if these answers are better than the ones I’m about to grade: "When China becomes the world’s largest economy, the current ...

The following question was on the final exam for my Global Political Economy class this fall.  If you're interested, provide a one paragraph answer in the comments.  I'll report back later in the week if these answers are better than the ones I'm about to grade:

"When China becomes the world's largest economy, the current era of globalization will come to an end.  The simple fact is that while Great Britain and the United States had open liberal polities, China does not.  This will foster mutual suspicion between China and the west, as well as discourage China from fully opening up its domestic market.  That, plus the geopolitical tensions that come from a hegemonic power transition, means we can expect a new era of mercantilism."

Do you agree or disagree with the above statement?  Why or why not? 

The following question was on the final exam for my Global Political Economy class this fall.  If you’re interested, provide a one paragraph answer in the comments.  I’ll report back later in the week if these answers are better than the ones I’m about to grade:

"When China becomes the world’s largest economy, the current era of globalization will come to an end.  The simple fact is that while Great Britain and the United States had open liberal polities, China does not.  This will foster mutual suspicion between China and the west, as well as discourage China from fully opening up its domestic market.  That, plus the geopolitical tensions that come from a hegemonic power transition, means we can expect a new era of mercantilism."

Do you agree or disagree with the above statement?  Why or why not? 

Hint:  you get absolutely no extra credit for agreeing or disagreeing with anything previously said on the subject on this blog. 

Daniel W. Drezner is a professor of international politics at Tufts University’s Fletcher School. He blogged regularly for Foreign Policy from 2009 to 2014. Twitter: @dandrezner

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