Yegor Gaidar

Former Russian Finance Minister and distinguished economist Yegor Gaidar passed away at his home outside Moscow at the age of 53. Gaidar is best known as the architect of “shock therapy,” the rapid privitization of the Russian economy in the early 1990s. He also served for several months as prime minister under Boris Yeltsin’s presidency. ...

By , a former associate editor at Foreign Policy.
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A file picture taken on September 8, 2003 shows former Russian Prime Minister Yegor Gaidar at a congress of the Union of Right Forces party in Moscow. Russian economist Yegor Gaidar, the mastermind of the controversial "shock therapy" economic reforms implemented under former president Boris Yeltsin, died on December 16, 2009 aged 53, his spokesman told AFP. AFP PHOTO / DENIS SINYAKOV (Photo credit should read DENIS SINYAKOV/AFP/Getty Images)

Former Russian Finance Minister and distinguished economist Yegor Gaidar passed away at his home outside Moscow at the age of 53. Gaidar is best known as the architect of "shock therapy," the rapid privitization of the Russian economy in the early 1990s. He also served for several months as prime minister under Boris Yeltsin's presidency. He was also a longtime friend of Foreign Policy and served for many years as a contributing editor and member of our editorial board.

The tributes have begun pouring in from Gaidar's friends as well as his enemies today, but one of the most moving was a post on the American Enterprise Institute's Enterprise blog by Leon Aron, director of Russian studies at the AEI and a friend of Gaidar's. It is reprinted in full here with his permission:

Egor Gaidar, the man to whom Boris Yeltsin entrusted Russia’s free-market revolution, died yesterday. He was 53.

Former Russian Finance Minister and distinguished economist Yegor Gaidar passed away at his home outside Moscow at the age of 53. Gaidar is best known as the architect of “shock therapy,” the rapid privitization of the Russian economy in the early 1990s. He also served for several months as prime minister under Boris Yeltsin’s presidency. He was also a longtime friend of Foreign Policy and served for many years as a contributing editor and member of our editorial board.

The tributes have begun pouring in from Gaidar’s friends as well as his enemies today, but one of the most moving was a post on the American Enterprise Institute’s Enterprise blog by Leon Aron, director of Russian studies at the AEI and a friend of Gaidar’s. It is reprinted in full here with his permission:

Egor Gaidar, the man to whom Boris Yeltsin entrusted Russia’s free-market revolution, died yesterday. He was 53.

Every time we had dinner in D.C. or Moscow in the past seven years, he looked worse and worse. He took bad care of himself. He drank more and more. Last time I saw him in his favorite D.C. restaurant, Morton’s, he looked like an old man and, formerly a hearty eater and a gourmand, barely touched his steak.

He was deeply depressed—by the direction Russia was taking; by his inability to do anything about it; and by the vicious calumny spread by the Kremlin about Russia’s freest years, the 1990s, and about his reforms, which literally saved the country from the famine everyone expected in 1992. It will take decades to clear out the Augean stables of the monstrously irrational and wasteful Soviet economy, but the first few, heaviest shovelfuls were Egor’s.

Throughout it all, he continued to write complicated and important books that only a brilliant economist and economic historian could have conceived and produced, and that future generations of Russians will enjoy and appreciate. (We were fortunate to publish excerpts from his last book, The Death of an Empire, as an AEI paper.)

Following Yeltsin’s death less than three years before and that of the “godfather of glasnost,” Alexander Yakovlev, in 2005, it is almost like nature itself has conspired to make the Gorbachev-Yeltsin-Gaidar revolution an aberration and Putinism Russia’s norm. As if Dostoevsky’s Great Inquisitor was right when he told the imaginary Christ: you have come to make people free, but they don’t want to be free.

I know that this is not so, and I know, too, that deep down, Egor did not believe this. But it must have been so hard to keep faith. The last eight years have gradually killed him. He died of a broken heart.

DENIS SINYAKOV/AFP/Getty Images

Joshua Keating was an associate editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @joshuakeating

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