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Women rule, at least on global college campuses. Over the past 20 years, as greater opportunities for women have spread around the world, female students have gone from being a minority on campuses (in 1988, the world average was 64 women for every 100 men) to being the majority. But does increased access to higher ...

TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images
TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images

Women rule, at least on global college campuses. Over the past 20 years, as greater opportunities for women have spread around the world, female students have gone from being a minority on campuses (in 1988, the world average was 64 women for every 100 men) to being the majority. But does increased access to higher education lead to greater numbers of women in the paid workforce? The U.S. experience isn’t encouraging: American women have outnumbered men on campus for decades, but today still receive less pay and hold fewer positions in government, though the gap appears to be closing. Classroom ratios don’t seem to translate to boardroom ratios — at least not yet.

Percentage of college students who are female:

  • 71%    Bermuda
  • 57%    United States
  • 56%    Brazil
  • 53%    Iran
  • 38%    South Korea

Source: World Bank, 2007-2008

Preeti Aroon was copy chief at Foreign Policy from 2009 to 2016 and was an FP assistant editor from 2007 to 2009. Twitter: @pjaroonFP

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