In Box

Top of the Class

Women rule, at least on global college campuses. Over the past 20 years, as greater opportunities for women have spread around the world, female students have gone from being a minority on campuses (in 1988, the world average was 64 women for every 100 men) to being the majority. But does increased access to higher ...

TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images
TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images

Women rule, at least on global college campuses. Over the past 20 years, as greater opportunities for women have spread around the world, female students have gone from being a minority on campuses (in 1988, the world average was 64 women for every 100 men) to being the majority. But does increased access to higher education lead to greater numbers of women in the paid workforce? The U.S. experience isn't encouraging: American women have outnumbered men on campus for decades, but today still receive less pay and hold fewer positions in government, though the gap appears to be closing. Classroom ratios don't seem to translate to boardroom ratios -- at least not yet.

Percentage of college students who are female:

71%    Bermuda 57%    United States 56%    Brazil 53%    Iran 38%    South Korea

Women rule, at least on global college campuses. Over the past 20 years, as greater opportunities for women have spread around the world, female students have gone from being a minority on campuses (in 1988, the world average was 64 women for every 100 men) to being the majority. But does increased access to higher education lead to greater numbers of women in the paid workforce? The U.S. experience isn’t encouraging: American women have outnumbered men on campus for decades, but today still receive less pay and hold fewer positions in government, though the gap appears to be closing. Classroom ratios don’t seem to translate to boardroom ratios — at least not yet.

Percentage of college students who are female:

  • 71%    Bermuda
  • 57%    United States
  • 56%    Brazil
  • 53%    Iran
  • 38%    South Korea

Source: World Bank, 2007-2008

Preeti Aroon was copy chief at Foreign Policy from 2009 to 2016 and was an FP assistant editor from 2007 to 2009. Twitter: @pjaroonFP

More from Foreign Policy

The Taliban delegation leaves the hotel after meeting with representatives of Russia, China, the United States, Pakistan, Afghanistan, and Qatar in Moscow on March 19.

China and the Taliban Begin Their Romance

Beijing has its eyes set on using Afghanistan as a strategic corridor once U.S. troops are out of the way.

An Afghan security member pours gasoline over a pile of seized drugs and alcoholic drinks

The Taliban Are Breaking Bad

Meth is even more profitable than heroin—and is turbocharging the insurgency.

Sviatlana Tsikhanouskaya addresses the U.N. Security Council from her office in Vilnius, Lithuania, on Sept. 4, 2020.

Belarus’s Unlikely New Leader

Sviatlana Tsikhanouskaya didn’t set out to challenge a brutal dictatorship.

Taliban spokesperson Zabihullah Mujahid

What the Taliban Takeover Means for India

Kabul’s swift collapse leaves New Delhi with significant security concerns.