Clinton speech: Development ‘central to advancing American interests’

Secretary Clinton delivered a speech, as seen above, today at the Peterson Institute for International Economics. In discussing development as one of the three pillars of U.S. foreign policy — defense, diplomacy, and development — she said: [D]evelopment was once the province of humanitarians, charities, and governments looking to gain allies in global struggles. Today ...

MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images
MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images
MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images

Secretary Clinton delivered a speech, as seen above, today at the Peterson Institute for International Economics. In discussing development as one of the three pillars of U.S. foreign policy -- defense, diplomacy, and development -- she said:

[D]evelopment was once the province of humanitarians, charities, and governments looking to gain allies in global struggles. Today it is a strategic, economic, and moral imperative -- as central to advancing American interests and solving global problems as diplomacy and defense."

She was wise is stressing that throwing dollars at the problem isn't enough. There must be accountability:

Secretary Clinton delivered a speech, as seen above, today at the Peterson Institute for International Economics. In discussing development as one of the three pillars of U.S. foreign policy — defense, diplomacy, and development — she said:

[D]evelopment was once the province of humanitarians, charities, and governments looking to gain allies in global struggles. Today it is a strategic, economic, and moral imperative — as central to advancing American interests and solving global problems as diplomacy and defense."

She was wise is stressing that throwing dollars at the problem isn’t enough. There must be accountability:

[W]e must evaluate our progress and have the courage to rethink our strategies if we fall short. We must not simply tally the dollars we spend or the number of programs we run, but measure the lasting changes that these dollars and programs help achieve."

Meanwhile, this speech isn’t the only one Clinton will be giving this week. Friday, she is giving a speech to commemorate the 15th

anniversary of the International Conference on Population and Development. I’ll attend, if I can get away from the office.

Preeti Aroon was copy chief at Foreign Policy from 2009 to 2016 and was an FP assistant editor from 2007 to 2009. Twitter: @pjaroonFP

More from Foreign Policy

Demonstrators and activists attend a vigil in support of Ukraine near European Union headquarters in Brussels on March 22.
Demonstrators and activists attend a vigil in support of Ukraine near European Union headquarters in Brussels on March 22.

How the Russian Oil Price Cap Will Work

Ignore the naysayers—the long-prepared plan is a smart way to slash the Kremlin’s profits.

Ukrainian soldiers ride a tank on a road in the Donetsk region on July 20, 2022, near the front line between Russian and Ukrainian forces.
Ukrainian soldiers ride a tank on a road in the Donetsk region on July 20, 2022, near the front line between Russian and Ukrainian forces.

‘They Are Pushing Everywhere’: Kyiv Goes on the Offensive

Ukraine may have achieved its biggest breakthrough of the war.

A Chinese Communist Party flag is seen next to a health worker wearing protective clothing as a worker registers for a COVID-19 test at a makeshift testing site in Beijing on April 28.
A Chinese Communist Party flag is seen next to a health worker wearing protective clothing as a worker registers for a COVID-19 test at a makeshift testing site in Beijing on April 28.

The Chinese Public Doesn’t Know What the Rules Are Anymore

Reckless policies have knocked out established norms.

An orchestra at the Bolshoi Theatre in Russia
An orchestra at the Bolshoi Theatre in Russia

The Last String of Russian Greatness Is About to Snap

A great classical music tradition might die because of the Ukraine invasion.