Passport

Iranian TV says Neda’s death was faked

 A new documentary shown on Iranian state TV claims that the death of Neda Agha Soltan, who became an international icon of the Iranian opposition movement, was a hoax. Radio Free Europe’s Golnaz Esfandiari reports:  The program says that Neda threw blood on her own face before being shot dead in the car that was ...

Mario Tama/Getty Images)
Mario Tama/Getty Images)

 A new documentary shown on Iranian state TV claims that the death of Neda Agha Soltan, who became an international icon of the Iranian opposition movement, was a hoax. Radio Free Europe’s Golnaz Esfandiari reports

The program says that Neda threw blood on her own face before being shot dead in the car that was taking her to the hospital.

"Neda for a moment realizes their wicked plan and struggles to escape, but they quickly shoot her from behind," the narrator claims.

Among participants in the "plot" identified in the documentary are Arash Hejazi, a writer and physician who tried to save Neda and later said a Basij militia member shot her and was briefly detained by onlookers, and Neda’s music teacher, who was with her at the time of her death.

Also today on ForeignPolicy.com, Hooman Majd, author of the brilliant The Ayatollah Begs to Differ, takes on some of the biggest prevailing myths of the Green Revolution. 

 

 A new documentary shown on Iranian state TV claims that the death of Neda Agha Soltan, who became an international icon of the Iranian opposition movement, was a hoax. Radio Free Europe’s Golnaz Esfandiari reports

The program says that Neda threw blood on her own face before being shot dead in the car that was taking her to the hospital.

"Neda for a moment realizes their wicked plan and struggles to escape, but they quickly shoot her from behind," the narrator claims.

Among participants in the "plot" identified in the documentary are Arash Hejazi, a writer and physician who tried to save Neda and later said a Basij militia member shot her and was briefly detained by onlookers, and Neda’s music teacher, who was with her at the time of her death.

Also today on ForeignPolicy.com, Hooman Majd, author of the brilliant The Ayatollah Begs to Differ, takes on some of the biggest prevailing myths of the Green Revolution. 

 

Joshua Keating was an associate editor at Foreign Policy  Twitter: @joshuakeating

Tag: Iran

More from Foreign Policy

The Taliban delegation leaves the hotel after meeting with representatives of Russia, China, the United States, Pakistan, Afghanistan, and Qatar in Moscow on March 19.

China and the Taliban Begin Their Romance

Beijing has its eyes set on using Afghanistan as a strategic corridor once U.S. troops are out of the way.

An Afghan security member pours gasoline over a pile of seized drugs and alcoholic drinks

The Taliban Are Breaking Bad

Meth is even more profitable than heroin—and is turbocharging the insurgency.

Sviatlana Tsikhanouskaya addresses the U.N. Security Council from her office in Vilnius, Lithuania, on Sept. 4, 2020.

Belarus’s Unlikely New Leader

Sviatlana Tsikhanouskaya didn’t set out to challenge a brutal dictatorship.

Taliban spokesperson Zabihullah Mujahid

What the Taliban Takeover Means for India

Kabul’s swift collapse leaves New Delhi with significant security concerns.