Shadow Government

A front-row seat to the Republicans' debate over foreign policy, including their critique of the Biden administration.

2010: Obama’s road ahead

This week marks the one-year anniversary of President Obama’s inauguration, and along with it has come much commentary evaluating his first year in office. While we at Shadow Government certainly have not shied from offering our own thoughts (and sometimes even letter grades) on the Obama administration’s performance thus far, as erstwhile policy-makers ourselves we ...

By , the executive director of the Clements Center for National Security and the author of The Peacemaker: Ronald Reagan, the Cold War, and the World on the Brink.
Mark Wilson/Getty Images
Mark Wilson/Getty Images
Mark Wilson/Getty Images

This week marks the one-year anniversary of President Obama's inauguration, and along with it has come much commentary evaluating his first year in office. While we at Shadow Government certainly have not shied from offering our own thoughts (and sometimes even letter grades) on the Obama administration's performance thus far, as erstwhile policy-makers ourselves we also want to offer constructive input.

So today, instead of taking a look backward over the past year, we are taking a look forward to the coming year. What follows will be a series of suggestions of specific policy opportunities and/or challenges that the administration will face as this year unfolds.

Asia: Back to the fundamentals By Daniel Blumenthal  
Get China right by getting Asia right By Daniel Twining
Stop spending so much on defense By Kori Schake An Obama-Cameron partnership? By Will Inboden Holding out for the National Security Strategy By Peter Feaver It's all about Tehran and Pyongyang By Jamie Fly Keep an eye on new leaders By José R. Cárdenas A little "pro-trade" will go a long way By Phil Levy Push the democratic agenda in Iran, success in Iraq By John Hannah

This week marks the one-year anniversary of President Obama’s inauguration, and along with it has come much commentary evaluating his first year in office. While we at Shadow Government certainly have not shied from offering our own thoughts (and sometimes even letter grades) on the Obama administration’s performance thus far, as erstwhile policy-makers ourselves we also want to offer constructive input.

So today, instead of taking a look backward over the past year, we are taking a look forward to the coming year. What follows will be a series of suggestions of specific policy opportunities and/or challenges that the administration will face as this year unfolds.

Will Inboden is the executive director of the Clements Center for National Security and an associate professor at the LBJ School of Public Affairs, both at the University of Texas at Austin, a distinguished scholar at the Robert S. Strauss Center for International Security and Law, and the author of The Peacemaker: Ronald Reagan, the Cold War, and the World on the Brink.

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