Madam Secretary

Clinton: Internet freedom should be part of U.S. ‘national brand’

Today in her speech on Internet freedom, Secretary Clinton declared: I hope that refusal to support politically motivated censorship will become a trademark characteristic of American technology companies. … It should be part of our national brand."  She had some tough talk, saying: Countries or individuals that engage in cyberattacks should face consequences and international ...

Joshua Roberts/Getty Images
Joshua Roberts/Getty Images

Today in her speech on Internet freedom, Secretary Clinton declared:

I hope that refusal to support politically motivated censorship will become a trademark characteristic of American technology companies. … It should be part of our national brand." 

She had some tough talk, saying:

Countries or individuals that engage in cyberattacks should face consequences and international condemnation."

She also said:

In an interconnected world, an attack on one nation’s networks can be an attack on all."

Clinton took a tough stance, as she ought to have. So many of us rely so much on the Internet, and cyberattackers thousands of miles away can wreak so much havoc with just a few clicks.

Meanwhile, the Chinese government isn’t too happy 

Referencing Google’s donations to Obama’s campaigns, an editorial in the Chinese government-controlled Global Times yesterday labeled the U.S. administration as "Government Google" and stated:

The world’s top search engine, once hailed by many Chinese as a flagship of global innovation, is now on the brink of being made a political football played by the White House, and has aroused strong, hostile reactions from some Chinese users."

Today in her speech on Internet freedom, Secretary Clinton declared:

I hope that refusal to support politically motivated censorship will become a trademark characteristic of American technology companies. … It should be part of our national brand." 

She had some tough talk, saying:

Countries or individuals that engage in cyberattacks should face consequences and international condemnation."

She also said:

In an interconnected world, an attack on one nation’s networks can be an attack on all."

Clinton took a tough stance, as she ought to have. So many of us rely so much on the Internet, and cyberattackers thousands of miles away can wreak so much havoc with just a few clicks.

Meanwhile, the Chinese government isn’t too happy 

Referencing Google’s donations to Obama’s campaigns, an editorial in the Chinese government-controlled Global Times yesterday labeled the U.S. administration as "Government Google" and stated:

The world’s top search engine, once hailed by many Chinese as a flagship of global innovation, is now on the brink of being made a political football played by the White House, and has aroused strong, hostile reactions from some Chinese users."

Preeti Aroon was copy chief at Foreign Policy from 2009 to 2016 and was an FP assistant editor from 2007 to 2009. Twitter: @pjaroonFP

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