Mapping the Twilight Zone

Here's where Ghajar sits in relation to Lebanon, Israel, and Syria.

573853_100202_lebanon_southern_border_1986_edited12.jpg
573853_100202_lebanon_southern_border_1986_edited12.jpg

 

 

 

 

Red Line — The initial Israeli advance after the 1967 war.

Blue Line — When Israel withdrew from southern Lebanon in May 2000, they withdrew their forces south of this line.

Purple Line — Following the 2006 war between Lebanon and Israel, Israeli forces took control of the entire village and established the new boundary along a security fence on this line. The current negotiations surround a possible Israeli withdrawal from the area between the purple line and the blue line.

Top map: U.S. Central Intelligence Agency

Bottom map: The hand-drawn lines were provided by Nicholas Blanford

 

<p> Andrew Tabler is a senior fellow at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy and author of In the Lion's Den: An Eyewitness Account of Washington's Battle With Syria. </p>

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