Clinton wants more NATO-Russia cooperation

During a speech yesterday at the NATO Strategic Concept Seminar, Secretary Clinton said she wants “a cooperative NATO-Russia relationship that … draws NATO and Russia closer together.” Russia is worried that NATO is creeping eastward and that the former Soviet republics of Ukraine and Georgia might join. Thus, Russian leaders probably weren’t too happy when ...

Photos: JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images
Photos: JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images
Photos: JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images

During a speech yesterday at the NATO Strategic Concept Seminar, Secretary Clinton said she wants "a cooperative NATO-Russia relationship that … draws NATO and Russia closer together."

Russia is worried that NATO is creeping eastward and that the former Soviet republics of Ukraine and Georgia might join. Thus, Russian leaders probably weren't too happy when Clinton said, "We were glad to see the Alliance welcome Albania and Croatia last year. And there can be no question that NATO will continue to keep its doors open to new members."

Clinton also said that Russia has nothing to worry about. She declared: "Let me state this clearly and unambiguously: While Russia faces challenges to its security, NATO is not among them."

During a speech yesterday at the NATO Strategic Concept Seminar, Secretary Clinton said she wants “a cooperative NATO-Russia relationship that … draws NATO and Russia closer together.”

Russia is worried that NATO is creeping eastward and that the former Soviet republics of Ukraine and Georgia might join. Thus, Russian leaders probably weren’t too happy when Clinton said, “We were glad to see the Alliance welcome Albania and Croatia last year. And there can be no question that NATO will continue to keep its doors open to new members.”

Clinton also said that Russia has nothing to worry about. She declared: “Let me state this clearly and unambiguously: While Russia faces challenges to its security, NATO is not among them.”

She also said:

And we intend to use the NATO-Russia Council as a forum for frank discussions about areas where we disagree.… We will use it to challenge the assertion put forward in Russia’s new military doctrine that NATO’s enlargement and its global actions constitute a military danger to Russia.”

On a more humorous note, when asked whether she could imagine Russia ever being a NATO member, she generated laughter from the audience when she replied, “Well, I can imagine it. I’m not sure the Russians can imagine it.”

Below, former U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright greets Clinton as she steps to the stage to give her speech.

JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images

JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images

Preeti Aroon was copy chief at Foreign Policy from 2009 to 2016 and was an FP assistant editor from 2007 to 2009. Twitter: @pjaroonFP

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