This is my brain on too little sleep

Believing that this killer whale acted alone is a fool’s errand.  This is clearly a harbinger of future killer whale attacks.  I demand that the Department of Homeland Security launch a Killer Whale Division immediately.  These killer mammals of the theme park ocean must be brought to heed.  Some analysts might argue that this is ...

By , a professor of international politics at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University.

Believing that this killer whale acted alone is a fool's errand.  This is clearly a harbinger of future killer whale attacks.  I demand that the Department of Homeland Security launch a Killer Whale Division immediately.  These killer mammals of the theme park ocean must be brought to heed. 

Some analysts might argue that this is simply a misunderstanding, and that better communication would help.  This is national security naivite at its most extreme.  Indeed, according to the Los Angeles Times, this whale "had been involved in two previous deaths, including one at the water park in 1999."  I bet authorities are Mirandizing the whale as I type this. 

Negotiating with killer whales will accomplish nothing -- after all, they are killer whales.  We cannot rest unless we have put the largest mammals in the world in their proper place. 

Believing that this killer whale acted alone is a fool’s errand.  This is clearly a harbinger of future killer whale attacks.  I demand that the Department of Homeland Security launch a Killer Whale Division immediately.  These killer mammals of the theme park ocean must be brought to heed. 

Some analysts might argue that this is simply a misunderstanding, and that better communication would help.  This is national security naivite at its most extreme.  Indeed, according to the Los Angeles Times, this whale "had been involved in two previous deaths, including one at the water park in 1999."  I bet authorities are Mirandizing the whale as I type this. 

Negotiating with killer whales will accomplish nothing — after all, they are killer whales.  We cannot rest unless we have put the largest mammals in the world in their proper place. 

Daniel W. Drezner is a professor of international politics at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University, where he is the co-director of the Russia and Eurasia Program. Twitter: @dandrezner

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