Another disputed election. Another crackdown.

This time it’s Togo: Togo’s top opposition candidate said Monday that security forces have been provoking demonstrators with force, a day after the group staged protests claiming last week’s presidential election was rigged to favor the son of the country’s longtime dictator. Anti-riot police sealed off the sandy alleys leading to the headquarters of the ...

By , a former associate editor at Foreign Policy.
ISSOUF SANOGO/AFP/Getty Images
ISSOUF SANOGO/AFP/Getty Images
ISSOUF SANOGO/AFP/Getty Images

This time it's Togo:

Togo's top opposition candidate said Monday that security forces have been provoking demonstrators with force, a day after the group staged protests claiming last week's presidential election was rigged to favor the son of the country's longtime dictator.

Anti-riot police sealed off the sandy alleys leading to the headquarters of the opposition party, stranding the country's opposition leader Jean-Pierre Fabre outside for more than an hour in a tense standoff days after the disputed vote.

This time it’s Togo:

Togo’s top opposition candidate said Monday that security forces have been provoking demonstrators with force, a day after the group staged protests claiming last week’s presidential election was rigged to favor the son of the country’s longtime dictator.

Anti-riot police sealed off the sandy alleys leading to the headquarters of the opposition party, stranding the country’s opposition leader Jean-Pierre Fabre outside for more than an hour in a tense standoff days after the disputed vote.

The 57-year-old Fabre vowed Sunday to take to the streets every day to protest what he says was a fraudulent election, saying he would only stop when the police had exhausted their stock of tear gas or killed him.

From Kenya to Zimbabwe to Iran to Sri Lanka, the seemingly fraudulent eection followed by mass protest and government crackdown is becoming a familiar pattern. While Togo is unlikely to command international media attention long enough to get a "color" designation, it seems to fit the mold. 

The optimistic view of all these bloody post-elections is that opposition movements are becoming bolder about challenging fraudulent results. The bad news is that except for the original color revolutions in Ukraine and Georgia, the authorities always seem to win these confrontations. 

Joshua Keating was an associate editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @joshuakeating

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