Passport

Turkish PM threatens to expel Armenians

In the latest development in the Armenian genocide resolution row, Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan has hinted at expelling thousands of Armenians from the country. The threat was made as a result of genocide resolutions progressing in the U.S. Congress and Swedish parliament. About 100,000 undocumented Armenians live in Turkey (and another 70,000 legal ...

In the latest development in the Armenian genocide resolution row, Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan has hinted at expelling thousands of Armenians from the country. The threat was made as a result of genocide resolutions progressing in the U.S. Congress and Swedish parliament.

About 100,000 undocumented Armenians live in Turkey (and another 70,000 legal residents), many performing menial work.

Obviously Erdogan's words aren't helpful (and would seem particularly crass given the issue), but they're nothing new. Aris Nalci, editor at Agos, a Turkish-Armenian weekly, downplayed the remarks:

In the latest development in the Armenian genocide resolution row, Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan has hinted at expelling thousands of Armenians from the country. The threat was made as a result of genocide resolutions progressing in the U.S. Congress and Swedish parliament.

About 100,000 undocumented Armenians live in Turkey (and another 70,000 legal residents), many performing menial work.

Obviously Erdogan’s words aren’t helpful (and would seem particularly crass given the issue), but they’re nothing new. Aris Nalci, editor at Agos, a Turkish-Armenian weekly, downplayed the remarks:

We are not taking it as a serious threat.

Checking the scorecard, the impact of the committee vote is now a threat to the use of Incirlik Air base, a crucial link in the supply train to Iraq; damaging the peace process and rapprochement between Turkey and Armenia; and now a warning that tens of thousands of poor, migrant Armenians might get deported.

Does the foreign affairs committee still think it was worth it?

Andrew Swift is an editorial researcher at Foreign Policy.

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