Clinton hosts opening session of U.S.-Pakistan strategic dialogue

At 8 a.m. today, having returned to Washington from Mexico, Secretary Clinton hosted the opening session of the U.S.-Pakistan strategic dialogue, a two-day event during which nuclear energy, economic assistance for Pakistan, and security issues will be discussed. (Above, Clinton shakes hands with Pakistani Foreign Minister Makhdoom Shah Mehmood Qureshi.) The Pakistani delegation will probably ...

JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images
JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images
JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images

At 8 a.m. today, having returned to Washington from Mexico, Secretary Clinton hosted the opening session of the U.S.-Pakistan strategic dialogue, a two-day event during which nuclear energy, economic assistance for Pakistan, and security issues will be discussed. (Above, Clinton shakes hands with Pakistani Foreign Minister Makhdoom Shah Mehmood Qureshi.)

The Pakistani delegation will probably ask for a civilian nuclear deal similar to the one the United States signed with India, Pakistan's archenemy, but a lot of people on Capitol Hill and in New Delhi aren't going to be thrilled about that idea. (For more on whether Pakistan should get a nuclear deal, check out the FP piece, "Should Pakistan Get a Nuke Deal?")

A few excerpts of Clinton's remarks, as reported by the Associated Press:

At 8 a.m. today, having returned to Washington from Mexico, Secretary Clinton hosted the opening session of the U.S.-Pakistan strategic dialogue, a two-day event during which nuclear energy, economic assistance for Pakistan, and security issues will be discussed. (Above, Clinton shakes hands with Pakistani Foreign Minister Makhdoom Shah Mehmood Qureshi.)

The Pakistani delegation will probably ask for a civilian nuclear deal similar to the one the United States signed with India, Pakistan’s archenemy, but a lot of people on Capitol Hill and in New Delhi aren’t going to be thrilled about that idea. (For more on whether Pakistan should get a nuclear deal, check out the FP piece, "Should Pakistan Get a Nuke Deal?")

A few excerpts of Clinton’s remarks, as reported by the Associated Press:

Clinton acknowledged that "misperceptions and mistrust" have grown between the two countries, and said that overcoming the mutual suspicion requires sustained work across several areas of government.

"This is a new day," she said.

and:

"You are fighting a war whose outcome is critical first and foremost, of course, for the people of Pakistan," Clinton told the foreign minister. "But it will also have regional and global repercussions, and so strengthening and advancing your security remains a key priority of our relationship."

Preeti Aroon was copy chief at Foreign Policy from 2009 to 2016 and was an FP assistant editor from 2007 to 2009. Twitter: @pjaroonFP

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