Should Pakistan Get a Nuke Deal?

Only if it finally abandons its support for terrorism.

By , a professor at Georgetown University’s security studies program within the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service.
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572090_khan_02.jpg
Pakistani nuclear scientist Abdul Qadeer Khan prays during a ceremony at the Rawalpindi high court on January 9, 2010. Khan criticised the country's judiciary under the tenure of former president Pervez Musharraf while saying that the system enjoys greater freedoms in today's political climate. Khan admitted in 2004 during a televised statement that he leaked nuclear secrets to Iran, North Korea and Libya, although he later retracted his remarks. AFP PHOTO/BEHROUZ MEHRI (Photo credit should read BEHROUZ MEHRI/AFP/Getty Images)

Only if it finally abandons its support for terrorism.

Only if it finally abandons its support for terrorism.

C. Christine Fair is a professor at Georgetown University’s security studies program within the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service. She is the author of Fighting to the End: The Pakistan Army’s Way of War and In Their Own Words: Understanding Lashkar-e-Tayyaba.

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