Sarkozy blunt on U.S. healthcare reform

French President Nicolas Sarkozy seemed to break diplomatic protocol during a talk at Columbia University yesterday evening. Claiming he was going to "speak from the heart,"  Sarkozy toed a very fine line between personal commentary and interference in another country’s domestic affairs: Welcome to the club of states who don’t turn their back on the ...

ERIC FEFERBERG/AFP/Getty Images
ERIC FEFERBERG/AFP/Getty Images

French President Nicolas Sarkozy seemed to break diplomatic protocol during a talk at Columbia University yesterday evening. Claiming he was going to "speak from the heart,"  Sarkozy toed a very fine line between personal commentary and interference in another country's domestic affairs:

Welcome to the club of states who don't turn their back on the sick and the poor.

Yikes. He went on:

French President Nicolas Sarkozy seemed to break diplomatic protocol during a talk at Columbia University yesterday evening. Claiming he was going to "speak from the heart,"  Sarkozy toed a very fine line between personal commentary and interference in another country’s domestic affairs:

Welcome to the club of states who don’t turn their back on the sick and the poor.

Yikes. He went on:

If you come to France and something happens to you, you won’t be asked for your credit card before you’re rushed to the hospital.

While Sarkozy’s speech may have stepped on a few toes, it is hard to argue with his point. It’s astonishing to see a number of Americans whipped into an irrational frenzy over provisions that don’t exist and never did exist in the reforms. The cries of socialism were absurd enough, but the sudden surge in threats of violence against Democrats has no place in a democratic society.

Andrew Swift is an editorial researcher at Foreign Policy.

More from Foreign Policy

Bill Clinton and Joe Biden  at a meeting of the U.S. Congressional delegation to the NATO summit in Spain on July 7, 1998.

Liberal Illusions Caused the Ukraine Crisis

The greatest tragedy about Russia’s potential invasion is how easily it could have been avoided.

A report card is superimposed over U.S. President Joe Biden.

Is Biden’s Foreign Policy Grade A Material?

More than 30 experts grade the U.S. president’s first year of foreign policy.

White House National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan gives a press briefing.

Defining the Biden Doctrine

U.S. National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan sat down with FP to talk about Russia, China, relations with Europe, and year one of the Biden presidency.

Ukrainian servicemen taking part in the armed conflict with Russia-backed separatists in Donetsk region of the country attend the handover ceremony of military heavy weapons and equipment in Kiev on November 15, 2018.

The West’s Weapons Won’t Make Any Difference to Ukraine

U.S. military equipment wouldn’t realistically help Ukrainians—or intimidate Putin.