The difference between Putin and Medvedev

Ever wonder why Vladimir Putin is so much more popular in Russia than his presidential successor, Dmitry Medvedev? Their reactions to yesterday’s subway bombings in Moscow shows why. Putin said he’d like to "drag out of the sewer" the organizers of the attacks. And Medevev? He’d like the Supreme Court and the High Court of ...

MAXIM SHIPENKOV/AFP/Getty Images
MAXIM SHIPENKOV/AFP/Getty Images
MAXIM SHIPENKOV/AFP/Getty Images

Ever wonder why Vladimir Putin is so much more popular in Russia than his presidential successor, Dmitry Medvedev?

Their reactions to yesterday's subway bombings in Moscow shows why.

Putin said he'd like to "drag out of the sewer" the organizers of the attacks. And Medevev? He'd like the Supreme Court and the High Court of Arbitration to come up with some ways to improve counterterrorism laws.

Ever wonder why Vladimir Putin is so much more popular in Russia than his presidential successor, Dmitry Medvedev?

Their reactions to yesterday’s subway bombings in Moscow shows why.

Putin said he’d like to "drag out of the sewer" the organizers of the attacks. And Medevev? He’d like the Supreme Court and the High Court of Arbitration to come up with some ways to improve counterterrorism laws.

"I think we should give attention to some issues relating to improvement of the legislation aimed at preventing terrorism, including clear work of various agencies in charge of investigating such crimes," he reportedly said.

Later on, Medvedev seemed to understand Russians’ need to hear some tougher language, and promised to crush the attackers. "These are animals. Irrespective of their motives, what they do is a crime by any law and any moral standards," he said. "I have no doubt that we will find and destroy them all." But there’s no question which of the two leaders has his finger on the pulse.

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