The Cable

The Cable goes inside the foreign policy machine, from Foggy Bottom to Turtle Bay, the White House to Embassy Row.

Is Sarah Palin reading The Cable?

Today on her Facebook page, former Alaska governor Sarah Palin linked to our post on Congressional pressure over Iran sanctions legislation. Palin said: So the issue is not when the so-called sanctions will come (President Obama promised them in "weeks" today) but whether they will even "nibble." And while the Obama administration was more than ...

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571874_palin332.jpg
WASILLA, ALASKA - NOVEMBER 4: Republican vice-presidential nominee Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin reacts to an Anchorage Daily News front page headline reading "Board Exonerates Palin", which refers to a state investigation that concluded that Palin did not violate ethics rules by firing the state's public safety commissioner, in a coffee shop prior to casting their votes November 4, 2008 in Wasilla, Alaska. After nearly two years of presidential campaigning, U.S. citizens go to the polls today to vote in the election between Democratic presidential nominee U.S. Sen. Barack Obama (D-IL) and Republican nominee U.S. Sen. John McCain (R-AZ). (Photo by Johnny Wagner/Getty Images)

Today on her Facebook page, former Alaska governor Sarah Palin linked to our post on Congressional pressure over Iran sanctions legislation.

Palin said:

Today on her Facebook page, former Alaska governor Sarah Palin linked to our post on Congressional pressure over Iran sanctions legislation.

Palin said:

So the issue is not when the so-called sanctions will come (President Obama promised them in "weeks" today) but whether they will even "nibble." And while the Obama administration was more than willing to use every parliamentary trick in the book to ram its government health care takeover through Congress, conversely, it has worked hard to stall bipartisan efforts to pass the Iran Sanctions Act.

Now that President Obama has announced he wants the new UN Iran sanctions "within weeks," it may be a moot point. Congress is likely to take at least that long to get a conference together, much less pass the result of the conference through both chambers again.

Nevertheless, glad to know The Cable is making it all the way to Alaska! (or at least to Palin’s Washington foreign policy advisors).

Josh Rogin covers national security and foreign policy and writes the daily Web column The Cable. His column appears bi-weekly in the print edition of The Washington Post. He can be reached for comments or tips at josh.rogin@foreignpolicy.com.

Previously, Josh covered defense and foreign policy as a staff writer for Congressional Quarterly, writing extensively on Iraq, Afghanistan, Guantánamo Bay, U.S.-Asia relations, defense budgeting and appropriations, and the defense lobbying and contracting industries. Prior to that, he covered military modernization, cyber warfare, space, and missile defense for Federal Computer Week Magazine. He has also served as Pentagon Staff Reporter for the Asahi Shimbun, Japan's leading daily newspaper, in its Washington, D.C., bureau, where he reported on U.S.-Japan relations, Chinese military modernization, the North Korean nuclear crisis, and more.

A graduate of George Washington University's Elliott School of International Affairs, Josh lived in Yokohama, Japan, and studied at Tokyo's Sophia University. He speaks conversational Japanese and has reported from the region. He has also worked at the House International Relations Committee, the Embassy of Japan, and the Brookings Institution.

Josh's reporting has been featured on CNN, MSNBC, C-Span, CBS, ABC, NPR, WTOP, and several other outlets. He was a 2008-2009 National Press Foundation's Paul Miller Washington Reporting Fellow, 2009 military reporting fellow with the Knight Center for Specialized Journalism and the 2011 recipient of the InterAction Award for Excellence in International Reporting. He hails from Philadelphia and lives in Washington, D.C. Twitter: @joshrogin

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