Teenage goddess to pursue banking career

What’s a girl to do when she’s not a living goddess anymore? Apparently aim for a career in finance: Chanira Bajracharya, 15, has been the Kumari or “living goddess” of Patan, an ancient town south of Kathmandu, for nine years, blessing devotees at the temple and riding in decorated chariots 18 times a year during ...

By , a former associate editor at Foreign Policy.
PRAKASH MATHEMA/AFP/Getty Images
PRAKASH MATHEMA/AFP/Getty Images
PRAKASH MATHEMA/AFP/Getty Images

What's a girl to do when she's not a living goddess anymore? Apparently aim for a career in finance:

Chanira Bajracharya, 15, has been the Kumari or “living goddess” of Patan, an ancient town south of Kathmandu, for nine years, blessing devotees at the temple and riding in decorated chariots 18 times a year during Hindu and Buddhist festivals.

Now, with her time as living goddess drawing to a close — the young virgin deities retire on reaching puberty — Bajracharya is contemplating a career in banking if she makes grades good enough to study commerce or accounting.

What’s a girl to do when she’s not a living goddess anymore? Apparently aim for a career in finance:

Chanira Bajracharya, 15, has been the Kumari or “living goddess” of Patan, an ancient town south of Kathmandu, for nine years, blessing devotees at the temple and riding in decorated chariots 18 times a year during Hindu and Buddhist festivals.

Now, with her time as living goddess drawing to a close — the young virgin deities retire on reaching puberty — Bajracharya is contemplating a career in banking if she makes grades good enough to study commerce or accounting.

Last week she became the first living goddess ever to take the school leaving certificate examination, which was administered to her in her temple, which is housed in her home.

“I want to study commerce or accounting and be engaged in the banking sector,” she told Reuters in a rare interview, dressed in her ceremonial costumes, her eyes rimmed in black kohl and a third eye painted in the middle of her forehead.

Despite the attention, being a goddess doesn’t sound like much fun. Bajracharya isn’t allowed to attend school or mingle with other children and says she has no friends her age. She receives only about $20 a month for her services. A Nepalese Supreme Court order in 2008 forced the temple to provide the Kumaris with education and medical care.

Hopefully Bajracharya makes it through school and into the career of her choice. She’s certainly earned it and the global banking sector could use a little divine intervention these days. 

Joshua Keating was an associate editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @joshuakeating

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