Clinton offers condolences for the people of Poland

It has been a sad time in Poland with the death of the Polish president and much of the country’s leadership in Saturday’s plane crash. That day, Secretary Clinton offered condolences for the people of Poland, and among her remarks she said: The Polish people have endured more than their share of sorrow, but they ...

NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images
NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images
NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images

It has been a sad time in Poland with the death of the Polish president and much of the country's leadership in Saturday's plane crash. That day, Secretary Clinton offered condolences for the people of Poland, and among her remarks she said:

The Polish people have endured more than their share of sorrow, but they have always shown resilience and resolve in the face of adversity -- and I know they will pull together in solidarity to grieve this loss.

Above, Clinton signs the condolence book at the Polish Embassy in Washington yesterday as Polish Ambassador Robert Kupiecki looks on.

It has been a sad time in Poland with the death of the Polish president and much of the country’s leadership in Saturday’s plane crash. That day, Secretary Clinton offered condolences for the people of Poland, and among her remarks she said:

The Polish people have endured more than their share of sorrow, but they have always shown resilience and resolve in the face of adversity — and I know they will pull together in solidarity to grieve this loss.

Above, Clinton signs the condolence book at the Polish Embassy in Washington yesterday as Polish Ambassador Robert Kupiecki looks on.

The Polish delegation that died in the crash had been on its way to Russia to mark the 70th anniversary of the Katyn massacre, in which members of the Soviet secret police killed more than 20,000 captured Polish military officers. On Wednesday of last week, Clinton’s remarks about the 70th anniversary included the following:

This meeting of the current generation of Polish and Russian leaders is a sign of a much better present and of the hope for an increasingly bright and peaceful future. We welcome the strengthening of the Russian-Polish relationship this mutual tribute symbolizes, and hope that it promises the continued growth of cooperation in Europe .

It’s so sad that Saturday’s meeting never happened.

Update, April 12, 2010, 12:10 p.m.: Clinton’s remarks at the signing of the condolence book include:

So Mr. Ambassador, we Americans stand with you now and forever. Not only the many proud Polish Americans who grieve with you today, but every American who admires what Poland has built, admires what Poland stands for, admires the Polish people. 

Preeti Aroon was copy chief at Foreign Policy from 2009 to 2016 and was an FP assistant editor from 2007 to 2009. Twitter: @pjaroonFP

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