Shadow Government

A front-row seat to the Republicans' debate over foreign policy, including their critique of the Biden administration.

Welcome Joe Wood

Today we welcome the newest contributor to the Shadow Government roster, Joe Wood. Joe currently serves as a senior resident fellow at the German Marshall Fund. From 2005 until 2008, he was deputy assistant to the vice president for National Security Affairs at the White House, with responsibility for all policy involving Europe, Eurasia, and Africa. ...

By , the executive director of the Clements Center for National Security and the author of The Peacemaker: Ronald Reagan, the Cold War, and the World on the Brink.

Today we welcome the newest contributor to the Shadow Government roster, Joe Wood. Joe currently serves as a senior resident fellow at the German Marshall Fund. From 2005 until 2008, he was deputy assistant to the vice president for National Security Affairs at the White House, with responsibility for all policy involving Europe, Eurasia, and Africa. He is a retired Air Force colonel, and his career included operational and command fighter assignments in Korea and Europe; faculty duty in the Department of Political Science at the Air Force Academy where he taught U.S. foreign and defense policy; and service at the Pentagon as speech writer for the chief of staff and vice chief of staff of the Air Force. Joe is a graduate of the U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado and the French Joint Defense College in Paris, and he holds a Masters degree from Harvard's Kennedy School of Government.

Today we welcome the newest contributor to the Shadow Government roster, Joe Wood. Joe currently serves as a senior resident fellow at the German Marshall Fund. From 2005 until 2008, he was deputy assistant to the vice president for National Security Affairs at the White House, with responsibility for all policy involving Europe, Eurasia, and Africa. He is a retired Air Force colonel, and his career included operational and command fighter assignments in Korea and Europe; faculty duty in the Department of Political Science at the Air Force Academy where he taught U.S. foreign and defense policy; and service at the Pentagon as speech writer for the chief of staff and vice chief of staff of the Air Force. Joe is a graduate of the U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado and the French Joint Defense College in Paris, and he holds a Masters degree from Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government.

Joe is the first fighter pilot to join the ranks of Shadow Gov, and has a unique combination of operational as well as policy experience. Having had the privilege to work alongside him at the White House for two years, I can attest that he brings a wealth of insight to a range of issues. 

Will Inboden is the executive director of the Clements Center for National Security and an associate professor at the LBJ School of Public Affairs, both at the University of Texas at Austin, a distinguished scholar at the Robert S. Strauss Center for International Security and Law, and the author of The Peacemaker: Ronald Reagan, the Cold War, and the World on the Brink.

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