Former foster child credits Clinton for decision to attend law school

A former foster child whom Secretary Clinton mentioned in the 2006 edition of her book It Takes a Village, credits Clinton in influencing him in this decision to attend law school, as reported in the Washington Post. Jelani Freeman bounced through foster homes and group homes for much of his childhood, and when he beat ...

State Department via washingtonpost.com
State Department via washingtonpost.com
State Department via washingtonpost.com

A former foster child whom Secretary Clinton mentioned in the 2006 edition of her book It Takes a Village, credits Clinton in influencing him in this decision to attend law school, as reported in the Washington Post.

Jelani Freeman bounced through foster homes and group homes for much of his childhood, and when he beat the odds and graduated from college in 2002, he didn't even have anyone to attend the commencement ceremony and watch him cross the stage. After graduation, he interned in then-Senator Clinton's office through a program for former foster children. On Saturday, he graduated from Howard University's School of Law, and Freeman cites Clinton (a graduate of Yale Law School) as a positive influence:

"I sort of see this as a collective achievement," said Freeman, 29, who credits Clinton for his decision to go to law school. He had twice interned in her Senate office, and they had a talk about his career plans. "People say encouraging things to other people because it's the nice thing to do. But she was sincere. She helped me believe it."

A former foster child whom Secretary Clinton mentioned in the 2006 edition of her book It Takes a Village, credits Clinton in influencing him in this decision to attend law school, as reported in the Washington Post.

Jelani Freeman bounced through foster homes and group homes for much of his childhood, and when he beat the odds and graduated from college in 2002, he didn’t even have anyone to attend the commencement ceremony and watch him cross the stage. After graduation, he interned in then-Senator Clinton’s office through a program for former foster children. On Saturday, he graduated from Howard University’s School of Law, and Freeman cites Clinton (a graduate of Yale Law School) as a positive influence:

“I sort of see this as a collective achievement,” said Freeman, 29, who credits Clinton for his decision to go to law school. He had twice interned in her Senate office, and they had a talk about his career plans. “People say encouraging things to other people because it’s the nice thing to do. But she was sincere. She helped me believe it.”

It truly does take a village.

Preeti Aroon was copy chief at Foreign Policy from 2009 to 2016 and was an FP assistant editor from 2007 to 2009. Twitter: @pjaroonFP

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