Kuwaiti ‘refugee’ dogs looking for adoption in U.S.

View more news videos at: http://www.nbcwashington.com/video.   Kuwait’s only animal shelter burned down in a March fire caused by an electrical surge. Forty animals perished, but 60 dogs survived. Forty of the survivors found foster homes in Kuwait, but 20 are now here in the United States at the Washington Animal Rescue League (WARL). Who ...

Washington Animal Rescue League
Washington Animal Rescue League
Washington Animal Rescue League

View more news videos at: http://www.nbcwashington.com/video.

 

Kuwait's only animal shelter burned down in a March fire caused by an electrical surge. Forty animals perished, but 60 dogs survived. Forty of the survivors found foster homes in Kuwait, but 20 are now here in the United States at the Washington Animal Rescue League (WARL). Who knew it, but international animal rescues do happen. The Animal Friends League of Kuwait contacted Humane Society International, and now the dogs are in the USA. All are healthy, and several are now ready for adoption, according to a brief in the Washington Post yesterday. Eight are apparently "desert dogs" indigenous to Kuwait that have short coats and big ears.

View more news videos at: http://www.nbcwashington.com/video.

 

Kuwait’s only animal shelter burned down in a March fire caused by an electrical surge. Forty animals perished, but 60 dogs survived. Forty of the survivors found foster homes in Kuwait, but 20 are now here in the United States at the Washington Animal Rescue League (WARL). Who knew it, but international animal rescues do happen. The Animal Friends League of Kuwait contacted Humane Society International, and now the dogs are in the USA. All are healthy, and several are now ready for adoption, according to a brief in the Washington Post yesterday. Eight are apparently “desert dogs” indigenous to Kuwait that have short coats and big ears.

Anyone want to give a Kuwaiti dog a home?

(Yes, this post doesn’t relate to Secretary Clinton, but I couldn’t resist putting it up.)

Preeti Aroon was copy chief at Foreign Policy from 2009 to 2016 and was an FP assistant editor from 2007 to 2009. Twitter: @pjaroonFP

More from Foreign Policy

A worker cuts the nose off the last Ukraine's Tupolev-22M3, the Soviet-made strategic aircraft able to carry nuclear weapons at a military base in Poltava, Ukraine on Jan. 27, 2006. A total of 60 aircraft were destroyed  according to the USA-Ukrainian disarmament agreement.
A worker cuts the nose off the last Ukraine's Tupolev-22M3, the Soviet-made strategic aircraft able to carry nuclear weapons at a military base in Poltava, Ukraine on Jan. 27, 2006. A total of 60 aircraft were destroyed according to the USA-Ukrainian disarmament agreement.

Why Do People Hate Realism So Much?

The school of thought doesn’t explain everything—but its proponents foresaw the potential for conflict over Ukraine long before it erupted.

Employees watch a cargo ship at a port in China, which is experiencing an economic downturn.
Employees watch a cargo ship at a port in China, which is experiencing an economic downturn.

China’s Crisis of Confidence

What if, instead of being a competitor, China can no longer afford to compete at all?

Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell testifies in the U.S. Senate in Washington on Sept. 24, 2020.
Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell testifies in the U.S. Senate in Washington on Sept. 24, 2020.

Why This Global Economic Crisis Is Different

This is the first time since World War II that there may be no cooperative way out.

Chinese President Xi Jinping (left) and Premier Li Keqiang applaud at the closing session of the National People's Congress at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on March 11.
Chinese President Xi Jinping (left) and Premier Li Keqiang applaud at the closing session of the National People's Congress at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on March 11.

China Is Hardening Itself for Economic War

Beijing is trying to close economic vulnerabilities out of fear of U.S. containment.