Clinton and Nancy Reagan tie for best U.S. first ladies since 1974

Secretary Clinton and Nancy Reagan have tied for best U.S. first lady since 1974, according to a recent survey by Angus Reid Public Opinion. Clinton and Reagan each received 19 percent, while current first lady Michelle Obama received 15 percent. (In the November 1997 photo above, then first lady Hillary Clinton stands with, from left, ...

JOHN MOTTERN/AFP/Getty Images
JOHN MOTTERN/AFP/Getty Images
JOHN MOTTERN/AFP/Getty Images

Secretary Clinton and Nancy Reagan have tied for best U.S. first lady since 1974, according to a recent survey by Angus Reid Public Opinion. Clinton and Reagan each received 19 percent, while current first lady Michelle Obama received 15 percent. (In the November 1997 photo above, then first lady Hillary Clinton stands with, from left, former first ladies Lady Bird Johnson, Barbara Bush, Betty Ford, and Nancy Reagan.)

There was a split among male and female respondents. Among women, the survey results were: Obama (20 percent), Clinton (18 percent), and Reagan (14 percent). Among men, the survey results were Reagan (24 percent), Clinton (20 percent), and Laura Bush (11 percent).

(The online poll, with a margin of error of  +/- 3.1 percent, questioned 1,016 American adults from May 13 to 14, 2010, and was statistically weighted to be demographically representative of the United States.)

Secretary Clinton and Nancy Reagan have tied for best U.S. first lady since 1974, according to a recent survey by Angus Reid Public Opinion. Clinton and Reagan each received 19 percent, while current first lady Michelle Obama received 15 percent. (In the November 1997 photo above, then first lady Hillary Clinton stands with, from left, former first ladies Lady Bird Johnson, Barbara Bush, Betty Ford, and Nancy Reagan.)

There was a split among male and female respondents. Among women, the survey results were: Obama (20 percent), Clinton (18 percent), and Reagan (14 percent). Among men, the survey results were Reagan (24 percent), Clinton (20 percent), and Laura Bush (11 percent).

(The online poll, with a margin of error of  +/- 3.1 percent, questioned 1,016 American adults from May 13 to 14, 2010, and was statistically weighted to be demographically representative of the United States.)

JOHN MOTTERN/AFP/Getty Images

JOHN MOTTERN/AFP/Getty Images

Preeti Aroon was copy chief at Foreign Policy from 2009 to 2016 and was an FP assistant editor from 2007 to 2009. Twitter: @pjaroonFP

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