Clinton: U.S. ‘definitely committed’ to considering India for U.N. Security Council

The United States is "definitely committed to the consideration of India" on the U.N. Security Council, Secretary Clinton said yesterday in a news conference (seen above) after meeting with Indian External Affairs Minister S.M. Krishna as part of the U.S.-India Strategic Dialogue. In her opening remarks to the dialogue, Clinton had said: India’s growing global ...

SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images
SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images
SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images

The United States is "definitely committed to the consideration of India" on the U.N. Security Council, Secretary Clinton said yesterday in a news conference (seen above) after meeting with Indian External Affairs Minister S.M. Krishna as part of the U.S.-India Strategic Dialogue.

In her opening remarks to the dialogue, Clinton had said:

India's growing global role requires us to reassess institutions of global governance. India's rise will certainly be a factor in any future consideration of reform of the United Nations Security Council.

The United States is "definitely committed to the consideration of India" on the U.N. Security Council, Secretary Clinton said yesterday in a news conference (seen above) after meeting with Indian External Affairs Minister S.M. Krishna as part of the U.S.-India Strategic Dialogue.

In her opening remarks to the dialogue, Clinton had said:

India’s growing global role requires us to reassess institutions of global governance. India’s rise will certainly be a factor in any future consideration of reform of the United Nations Security Council.

Later in the day, when Clinton and Krishna met with the media, a reporter from the Press Trust of India asked Clinton, "[Y]ou spoke about India’s being an indispensable partner and trusted friend. So what is holding United States from endorsing India as a member of — permanent member of — the United Nations Security Council?"

After discussing other issues for a bit, Clinton answered:

"[W]e don’t have any way forward yet on Security Council reform, but we are obviously very committed to considering India. At this point, as you probably know, there is no consensus in the world, and that is the challenge of dealing with multilateral organizations. I think as Minister Krishna said at another point in our meeting today, once you get to multilateral negotiations it slows down considerably. But we are definitely committed to the consideration of India."

Other notes about Clinton’s big India day:

In her opening remarks, Clinton made some highly complimentary remarks about India:

We’ve said it many times, but it cannot be said too often: India is the world’s largest democracy, its second-fastest growing economy, and a rising power, not only in Asia but globally. It has vibrant democratic institutions, a very free press, a robust civil society, and an innovative private sector. It is also a model of democratic development that is lifting millions of people out of poverty by widening access to tools of opportunity, such as education, health care, food, water, and jobs.

India’s rise is a defining storyline of the early 21st century .

Clinton also called upon India to open its economy more, saying:

Together, we must reduce barriers to trade and investment going in both directions. And we urge India to reduce or ease caps on investment in critical sectors, which would help open markets and create millions of jobs in both countries.

She also expressed hope that India would pass legislation allowing foreign universities to open campuses in India, a topic addressed by Sudip Mazumdar in the recent FP piece, "Will There Be an Indian Harvard?" Clinton said:

[W]e hope that India will pass legislation now under review that would allow foreign universities to open campuses in India in accordance with appropriate regulations, of course. A number of U.S. institutions have expressed interest in opening Indian campuses and working with Indian scholars and students, whose talents are internationally renowned."

Preeti Aroon was copy chief at Foreign Policy from 2009 to 2016 and was an FP assistant editor from 2007 to 2009. Twitter: @pjaroonFP

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