Clinton expects Iran ‘to pull some stunt’ soon

With a possible U.N. Security Council vote on a sanctions resolution against Iran this week, Secretary Clinton declared yesterday: "I fully expect Iran to pull some stunt in the next couple of days because they know that sanctions are on the way." According to the Associated Press, her tough words also included: "I think we ...

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

With a possible U.N. Security Council vote on a sanctions resolution against Iran this week, Secretary Clinton declared yesterday:

"I fully expect Iran to pull some stunt in the next couple of days because they know that sanctions are on the way."

According to the Associated Press, her tough words also included:

With a possible U.N. Security Council vote on a sanctions resolution against Iran this week, Secretary Clinton declared yesterday:

"I fully expect Iran to pull some stunt in the next couple of days because they know that sanctions are on the way."

According to the Associated Press, her tough words also included:

"I think we will see something coming up in the next 24 to 48 hours where Iran says, ‘Wait a minute, wait a minute, look at what we’re going to do now.’"

Clinton made the remarks as she departed on trip to Latin America, where she is expected to urge Brazil, an elected Security Council member that doesn’t support U.N. sanctions against Iran, to come over to the U.S. side on the issue. As explained in the recent FP piece, "Ahmadinejad’s Sugar Daddy," Brazilian ethanol could help Iran outwit the United States on sanctions.

Just a couple of weeks ago at the Brookings Institution, as seen above, Clinton said, "We think buying time for Iran, enabling Iran to avoid international unity with respect to their nuclear program, makes the world more dangerous not less."

Preeti Aroon was copy chief at Foreign Policy from 2009 to 2016 and was an FP assistant editor from 2007 to 2009. Twitter: @pjaroonFP

More from Foreign Policy

An illustration shows George Kennan, the father of Cold War containment strategy.
An illustration shows George Kennan, the father of Cold War containment strategy.

Is Cold War Inevitable?

A new biography of George Kennan, the father of containment, raises questions about whether the old Cold War—and the emerging one with China—could have been avoided.

U.S. President Joe Biden speaks on the DISCLOSE Act.
U.S. President Joe Biden speaks on the DISCLOSE Act.

So You Want to Buy an Ambassadorship

The United States is the only Western government that routinely rewards mega-donors with top diplomatic posts.

Chinese President Xi jinping  toasts the guests during a banquet marking the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China on September 30, 2019 in Beijing, China.
Chinese President Xi jinping toasts the guests during a banquet marking the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China on September 30, 2019 in Beijing, China.

Can China Pull Off Its Charm Offensive?

Why Beijing’s foreign-policy reset will—or won’t—work out.

Turkish Defense Minister Hulusi Akar chairs a meeting in Ankara, Turkey on Nov. 21, 2022.
Turkish Defense Minister Hulusi Akar chairs a meeting in Ankara, Turkey on Nov. 21, 2022.

Turkey’s Problem Isn’t Sweden. It’s the United States.

Erdogan has focused on Stockholm’s stance toward Kurdish exile groups, but Ankara’s real demand is the end of U.S. support for Kurds in Syria.