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Arnold to lead the Asia Foundation

The Asia Foundation has selected David Arnold to be its next president and CEO, replacing outgoing president Douglas Bereuter, a former congressman from Nebraska. Arnold, who is currently the president of the American University in Cairo, will come back to the United States and assume his new post in January. Bereuter steps down at the ...

The Asia Foundation has selected David Arnold to be its next president and CEO, replacing outgoing president Douglas Bereuter, a former congressman from Nebraska.

Arnold, who is currently the president of the American University in Cairo, will come back to the United States and assume his new post in January. Bereuter steps down at the end of September. Since coming to AUC in 2003, Arnold oversaw the university's move from its downtown campus and the construction of a new $400 million campus outside the city. He previously was the Ford Foundation's first representative in India, Nepal, and Sri Lanka.

"In some ways, this feels like coming home to me," Arnold told The Cable in an interview from Cairo, explaining that he spent the bulk of his professional life dealing with governance, civil society, women's empowerment, and post-conflict resolution in Asia. "It feels like a natural progression."

The Asia Foundation has selected David Arnold to be its next president and CEO, replacing outgoing president Douglas Bereuter, a former congressman from Nebraska.

Arnold, who is currently the president of the American University in Cairo, will come back to the United States and assume his new post in January. Bereuter steps down at the end of September. Since coming to AUC in 2003, Arnold oversaw the university’s move from its downtown campus and the construction of a new $400 million campus outside the city. He previously was the Ford Foundation’s first representative in India, Nepal, and Sri Lanka.

“In some ways, this feels like coming home to me,” Arnold told The Cable in an interview from Cairo, explaining that he spent the bulk of his professional life dealing with governance, civil society, women’s empowerment, and post-conflict resolution in Asia. “It feels like a natural progression.”

Still, his recent work in the Middle East will factor into his new role, as he seeks to incorporate work in the two regions where appropriate. “There are a lot of common threads,” he said.

Arnold will be based in San Francisco, where the foundation is headquartered, but expects to travel frequently to Washington, New York, and the foundation’s 18 other offices spread throughout the region. That will also let him spend more time with his three daughters and six grandchildren, who are based in San Francisco and New York.

As for who will replace Arnold at AUC, that’s still being decided. A search committee led by former U.S. Ambassador to Egypt and India Frank Wisner has begun its work. AUC is a private institution, it should be noted, and is not affiliated with the U.S. government, though it has had close ties to the United States since its1919 founding by the American missionary Charles A. Watson.

Josh Rogin covers national security and foreign policy and writes the daily Web column The Cable. His column appears bi-weekly in the print edition of The Washington Post. He can be reached for comments or tips at josh.rogin@foreignpolicy.com.

Previously, Josh covered defense and foreign policy as a staff writer for Congressional Quarterly, writing extensively on Iraq, Afghanistan, Guantánamo Bay, U.S.-Asia relations, defense budgeting and appropriations, and the defense lobbying and contracting industries. Prior to that, he covered military modernization, cyber warfare, space, and missile defense for Federal Computer Week Magazine. He has also served as Pentagon Staff Reporter for the Asahi Shimbun, Japan's leading daily newspaper, in its Washington, D.C., bureau, where he reported on U.S.-Japan relations, Chinese military modernization, the North Korean nuclear crisis, and more.

A graduate of George Washington University's Elliott School of International Affairs, Josh lived in Yokohama, Japan, and studied at Tokyo's Sophia University. He speaks conversational Japanese and has reported from the region. He has also worked at the House International Relations Committee, the Embassy of Japan, and the Brookings Institution.

Josh's reporting has been featured on CNN, MSNBC, C-Span, CBS, ABC, NPR, WTOP, and several other outlets. He was a 2008-2009 National Press Foundation's Paul Miller Washington Reporting Fellow, 2009 military reporting fellow with the Knight Center for Specialized Journalism and the 2011 recipient of the InterAction Award for Excellence in International Reporting. He hails from Philadelphia and lives in Washington, D.C. Twitter: @joshrogin

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