Best Defense

Thomas E. Ricks' daily take on national security.

Quote of the day: Krulak on Gtmo’s costs

Interesting letter to the editor of the Washington Post from retired Gen. Charles Krulak, a former commandant of the Marine Corps: The greatest cost of Guantanamo has been to American global leadership and credibility as a nation that respects the rule of law. . . . There are not benefits to outweigh these costs. In ...

PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images
PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images
PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images

Interesting letter to the editor of the Washington Post from retired Gen. Charles Krulak, a former commandant of the Marine Corps:

The greatest cost of Guantanamo has been to American global leadership and credibility as a nation that respects the rule of law. . . . There are not benefits to outweigh these costs. In the time that federal courts convicted 195 members of al-Qaeda and its allies, the military commissions at Guantanamo convicted three. A recent report confirmed that most Guantanamo detainees have been low-level operatives. Many were captured and turned over to the United States by poor locals hoping to cash in on a $5,000 reward. The real absurdity of the Guantanamo boondoggle is that we never needed to spend a dime to create it."

Tom: Is it my imagination, or have Marine generals and Navy admirals been more vocal about opposing torture and abuse than have Army generals?

Interesting letter to the editor of the Washington Post from retired Gen. Charles Krulak, a former commandant of the Marine Corps:

The greatest cost of Guantanamo has been to American global leadership and credibility as a nation that respects the rule of law. . . . There are not benefits to outweigh these costs. In the time that federal courts convicted 195 members of al-Qaeda and its allies, the military commissions at Guantanamo convicted three. A recent report confirmed that most Guantanamo detainees have been low-level operatives. Many were captured and turned over to the United States by poor locals hoping to cash in on a $5,000 reward. The real absurdity of the Guantanamo boondoggle is that we never needed to spend a dime to create it."

Tom: Is it my imagination, or have Marine generals and Navy admirals been more vocal about opposing torture and abuse than have Army generals?

Thomas E. Ricks covered the U.S. military from 1991 to 2008 for the Wall Street Journal and then the Washington Post. He can be reached at ricksblogcomment@gmail.com. Twitter: @tomricks1

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