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Assistant Secretary Judith Ann Stock confirmed

More than six months after receiving her nomination, the Senate has finally confirmed Judith Ann Stock to become Assistant Secretary of State for Education and Cultural Affairs. "Ann Stock is already on the job and we are thrilled," said Assistant Secretary for Public Affairs P.J. Crowley. "This day has been a long time coming." Stock ...

More than six months after receiving her nomination, the Senate has finally confirmed Judith Ann Stock to become Assistant Secretary of State for Education and Cultural Affairs.

"Ann Stock is already on the job and we are thrilled," said Assistant Secretary for Public Affairs P.J. Crowley. "This day has been a long time coming."

Stock was waived through along with over 60 other Obama administration nominees that the Senate confirmed in one fell swoop on Thursday by voice vote. President Obama has been pushing the Senate to move on the nominations, even threatening to make appointments during the recess, a controversial tactic, especially when his own party is in the majority.

"The vast majority already have support from both parties," Obama said June 20, "But most of them are seeing their nominations intentionally delayed by Republican leaders, or even blocked altogether."

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-KY, said that the nominations couldn’t go through until the selection of Craig Becker for the National Labor Relations Board was separated out. Becker was not on today’s confirmation list.

Stock is currently the vice president for Institutional Affairs at the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts and served as an assistant to President Clinton and his social secretary from 1993 to 1997. She will report up to Undersecretary of State for Public Diplomacy Judith McHale.

"I am delighted by the confirmation of Ann Stock as Assistant Secretary for Educational and Cultural Affairs.  I know she will provide terrific leadership of that bureau’s people, programs, and initiatives in public diplomacy," McHale told The Cable.

According to the State Department website, the slot for her principal deputy is still vacant.

Josh Rogin covers national security and foreign policy and writes the daily Web column The Cable. His column appears bi-weekly in the print edition of The Washington Post. He can be reached for comments or tips at josh.rogin@foreignpolicy.com.

Previously, Josh covered defense and foreign policy as a staff writer for Congressional Quarterly, writing extensively on Iraq, Afghanistan, Guantánamo Bay, U.S.-Asia relations, defense budgeting and appropriations, and the defense lobbying and contracting industries. Prior to that, he covered military modernization, cyber warfare, space, and missile defense for Federal Computer Week Magazine. He has also served as Pentagon Staff Reporter for the Asahi Shimbun, Japan's leading daily newspaper, in its Washington, D.C., bureau, where he reported on U.S.-Japan relations, Chinese military modernization, the North Korean nuclear crisis, and more.

A graduate of George Washington University's Elliott School of International Affairs, Josh lived in Yokohama, Japan, and studied at Tokyo's Sophia University. He speaks conversational Japanese and has reported from the region. He has also worked at the House International Relations Committee, the Embassy of Japan, and the Brookings Institution.

Josh's reporting has been featured on CNN, MSNBC, C-Span, CBS, ABC, NPR, WTOP, and several other outlets. He was a 2008-2009 National Press Foundation's Paul Miller Washington Reporting Fellow, 2009 military reporting fellow with the Knight Center for Specialized Journalism and the 2011 recipient of the InterAction Award for Excellence in International Reporting. He hails from Philadelphia and lives in Washington, D.C. Twitter: @joshrogin

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